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Showing 16 results for Reinforcement

H. Ghiassian,
Volume 2, Issue 1 (3-2004)
Abstract

A study of bearing capacity and compressibility characteristics of cohesive soil, reinforced by geogrid and supporting square footing loads has been conducted. The lack of adequate frictional resistance between clay and reinforcing elements was compensated by using a thin sand layer (lens) encapsulating the geogrid sheet. In this way, tensile forces induced in the geogrid were transferred to the bulk clay medium through the sand particles and soil reinforcement was improved Experiments were conduced on two sets of specimens, one set of 1 x 1 x 1 m dimension and the footing size of 19 x 19 cm (series A), and the other set of 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 m dimension and the footing size of 3.7 x 3.7 cm (series B). The loading systems for the above specimens were stress controlled and strain controlled respectively. All specimens were saturated and presumably loaded under an undrained condition. The results qualitatively confirmed the effectiveness of the sand lens in improving the bearing capacity and settlement characteristics of the model footing. In series A, the maximum increase in the bearing capacity due to the presence of the sand lens was 17% whereas in series B, the amount of increase was 24%. The percentage reductions in the settlement for these results were 30% and 46% respectively.
S.n. Moghaddas Tafreshi, Gh. Tavakoli Mehrjardi, S.m. Moghaddas Tafreshi,
Volume 5, Issue 2 (6-2007)
Abstract

The safety of buried pipes under repeated load has been a challenging task in geotechnical engineering. In this paper artificial neural network and regression model for predicting the vertical deformation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), small diameter flexible pipes buried in reinforced trenches, which were subjected to repeated loadings to simulate the heavy vehicle loads, are proposed. The experimental data from tests show that the vertical diametric strain (VDS) of pipe embedded in reinforced sand depends on relative density of sand, number of reinforced layers and height of embedment depth of pipe significantly. Therefore in this investigation, the value of VDS is related to above pointed parameters. A database of 72 experiments from laboratory tests were utilized to train, validate and test the developed neural network and regression model. The results show that the predicted of the vertical diametric strain (VDS) using the trained neural network and regression model are in good agreement with the experimental results but the predictions obtained from the neural network are better than regression model as the maximum percentage of error for training data is less than 1.56% and 27.4%, for neural network and regression model, respectively. Also the additional set of 24 data was used for validation of the model as 90% of predicted results have less than 7% and 21.5% error for neural network and regression model, respectively. A parametric study has been conducted using the trained neural network to study the important parameters on the vertical diametric strain.
S.n. Moghaddas Tafreshi, A. Asakereh,
Volume 5, Issue 4 (12-2007)
Abstract

Conventional investigations on the behavior of reinforced and unreinforced soils are often investigated at the failure point. In this paper, a new concept of comparison of the behavior of reinforced and unreinforced soil by estimating the strength and strength ratio (deviatoric stress of reinforced sample to unreinforced sample) at various strain levels is proposed. A comprehensive set of laboratory triaxial compression tests was carried out on wet (natural water content) non-plastic beach silty sand with and without geotextile. The layer configurations used are one, two, three and four horizontal reinforcing layers in a triaxial test sample. The influences of the number of geotextile layers and confining pressure at 3%, 6%, 9%, 12% and 15% of the imposed strain levels on sample were studied and described. The results show that the trend and magnitude of strength ratio is different for various strain level. It implies that using failure strength from peak point or strength corresponding to the axial-strain approximately 15% to evaluate the enhancement of strength or strength ratio due to reinforcement may cause hazard and uncertainty in practical design. Hence, it is necessary to consider the strength of reinforced sample compared with unreinforced sample at the imposed strain level. Only one type of soil and one type of geotextile were used in all tests.
Mahmood R. Abdi, Ali Parsapajouh, Mohammad A. Arjomand,
Volume 6, Issue 4 (12-2008)
Abstract

Clay soils and their related abnormal behavior such as excessive shrinkage, swelling, consolidation settlement and cracking on drying has been the subject of many investigations. Previous studies mainly evaluated the effects of additives such as lime, cement and sand on these characteristics. Initial results indicated that the soil characteristics were improved. However, reportedly in many cases, these additives resulted in a decrease in plasticity and increase in hydraulic conductivity. As a result, there has been a growing interest in soil/fiber reinforcement. The present investigation has focused on the impact of short random fiber inclusion on consolidation settlement, swelling, hydraulic conductivity, shrinkage limit and the development of desiccation cracks in compacted clays. To examine the possible improvements in the soil characteristics, samples consisting of 75% kaolinite and 25% montmorillonite were reinforced with 1, 2, 4 and 8 percent fibers as dry weight of soil with 5, 10 and 15mm lengths. Results indicated that consolidation settlements and swelling of fiber reinforced samples reduced substantially whereas hydraulic conductivities increased slightly by increasing fiber content and length. Shrinkage limits also showed an increase with increasing fiber content and length. This meant that samples experienced much less volumetric changes due to desiccation, and the extent of crack formation was significantly reduced.
S.a. Naeini, R. Ziaie_moayed,
Volume 7, Issue 2 (6-2009)
Abstract

In recent years, soil reinforcement is considered of great importance in many different civil projects. One of the most significant applications of soil reinforcement is in road construction. Sub grade soil and its properties are very important in the design of road pavement structure. Its main function is to give adequate support to the pavement from beneath. Therefore, it should have a sufficient load carrying capacity. The use of geosynthetics in road and airfield construction has shown the potential to increase the soil bearing capacity. One category of geosynthetics to particular, geogrid, has gained increasing acceptance in road construction. A geogrid is a geosynthetic material consisting of connected parallel sets of tensile ribs with apertures of sufficient size to allow strike-through of surrounding soil, stone, or other geotechnical material. Geogrid reinforcement of sub grade soil is achieved through the increase of frictional interaction between the soil and the reinforcement. Geogrid have been successfully used to provide a construction platform over subgrades. In this application, the geogrid improves the ability to obtain compaction in overlying aggregates, while reducing the amount of material required be removing and replacing. Relative agreement exists that substantial benefits can be achieved from the inclusion of geogrids within the pavement systems however, the quantity of the improvement is in relative disagreement. This paper presents the effects of plasticity index and also reinforcing of soft clay on CBR values. Three samples of clay with different plasticity index (PI) values are selected and tested without reinforcement. Then by placing one and two layer of geogrid at certain depth within sample height, the effects of reinforcement and PI on CBR values are investigated in both soaked and unsoaked conditions. The results shows that as the PI increase the CBR value decreases and reinforcing clay with geogrid will increase the CBR value.
A. Arabzadeh, A.r. Rahaie, A. Aghayari,
Volume 7, Issue 3 (9-2009)
Abstract

In this paper a new method based on Strut-and-Tie Model (STM) is proposed to determine the shear capacity of simply supported RC deep beams and an efficiency factor for concrete with considering the effect of web reinforcements. It is assumed that, the total carried shear force by RC deep beam provided by two independent resistance, namely diagonal concrete strut due to strut-and-tie mechanism and the equivalent resisting force resulted by web reinforcements, web reinforcing reduces the concrete compression softening effect with preventing from the diagonal cracks opening or concrete splitting. The unknown function and parameters are determined from 324 experimental results obtained by other researchers. To validate the proposed method, the obtained results are compared with some of the existing methods and codes such as ACI 318-05 and CSA. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable to predict the shear strength of variety of deep beams with acceptable accuracy.
M.r. Abdi, S. A. Sadrnejad, M.a. Arjomand,
Volume 7, Issue 4 (12-2009)
Abstract

Large size direct shear tests (i.e.300 x 300mm) were conducted to investigate the interaction between clay reinforced with geogrids embedded in thin layers of sand. Test results for the clay, sand, clay-sand, clay-geogrid, sandgeogrid and clay-sand-geogrid are discussed. Thin layers of sand including 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14mm were used to increase the interaction between the clay and the geogrids. Effects of sand layer thickness, normal pressure and transverse geogrid members were studied. All tests were conducted on saturated clay under unconsolidated-undrained (UU) conditions. Test results indicate that provision of thin layers of high strength sand on both sides of the geogrid is very effective in improving the strength and deformation behaviour of reinforced clay under UU loading conditions. Using geogrids embedded in thin layers of sand not only can improve performance of clay backfills but also it can provide drainage paths preventing pore water pressure generations. For the soil, geogrid and the normal pressures used, an optimum sand layer thickness of 10mm was determined which proved to be independent of the magnitude of the normal pressure used. Effect of sand layers combined with the geogrid reinforcement increased with increase in normal pressures. The improvement was more pronounced at higher normal pressures. Total shear resistance provided by the geogrids with transverse members removed was approximately 10% lower than shear resistance of geogrids with transverse members.
M. Saiidi, C. Cruz, D. Hillis,
Volume 8, Issue 1 (3-2010)
Abstract

Three unconventional details for plastic hinges of bridge columns subjected to seismic loads were developed,

designed, and implemented in a large-scale, four-span reinforced concrete bridge. Shape memory alloys (SMA),

special engineered cementitious composites (ECC), elastomeric pads embedded into columns, and post-tensioning

were used in three different piers. The bridge model was subjected to two-horizontal components of simulated

earthquake records of the 1994 Northridge earthquake in California. The multiple shake table system at the University

of Nevada, Reno was used for testing. Over 300 channels of data were collected. Test results showed the effectiveness

of post-tensioning and the innovative materials in reducing damage and permanent displacements. The damage was

minimal in plastic hinges with SMA/ECC and those with built in elastomeric pads. Conventional reinforced concrete

plastic hinges were severely damaged due to spalling of concrete and rupture of the longitudinal and transverse

reinforcement. Analytical studies showed close correlation between the results from the OpenSEES model and the

measured data for moderate and strong earthquakes.


Abolfazl Arabzadeh, Reza Aghayari, Ali Reza Rahai,
Volume 9, Issue 3 (9-2011)
Abstract

An experimental-analytical investigation was conducted to study the behavior of high-strength RC deep beams a total of sixteen

reinforced concrete deep beams with compressive strength in range of 59 MPaOfchr('39')c O65 MPa were tested under two-point top

loading. The shear span-to-effective depth ratio a/d was 1.10 all the specimens were simply supported and reinforced by

vertical, horizontal and orthogonal steel bars in various arrangements. The test specimens were composed of five series based

on their arrangement of shear reinforcing. The general behavior of tested beams was investigated. Observations were made on

mid-span and loading point deflections, cracks form, failure modes and shear strengths. The test results indicated that both

vertical and horizontal web reinforcement are efficient in shear capacity of deep beams, also the orthogonal shear reinforcement

was the most efficient when placed perpendicular to major axis of diagonal crack. Concentrating of shear reinforcement within

middle region of shear span can improve the ultimate shear strength of deep beam. The test results were then compared with the

predicted ultimate strengths using the ACI 318-08 provisions ACI code tended to either unsafe or scattered results. The

performed investigations deduced that the ACI code provisions need to be revised.


A. Asakereh, S.n. Moghaddas Tafreshi, M. Ghazavi,
Volume 10, Issue 2 (6-2012)
Abstract

This paper describes a series of laboratory model tests on strip footings supported on unreinforced and geogrid-reinforced sand
with an inside void. The footing is subjected to a combination of static and cyclic loading. The influence of various parameters
including the embedment depth of the void, the number of reinforcement layers, and the amplitude of cyclic load were studied.
The results show that the footing settlement due to repeated loading increased when the void existed in the failure zone of the
footing and decreased with increasing the void vertical distance from the footing bottom and with increasing the reinforcement
layers beneath the footing. For a specified amplitude of repeated load, the footing settlement is comparable for reinforced sand,
thicker soil layer over the void and much improved the settlement of unreinforced sand without void. In general, the results
indicate that, the reinforced soil-footing system with sufficient geogride-reinforcement and void embedment depth behaves much
stiffer and thus carries greater loading with lower settlement compared with unreinforced soil in the absent of void and can
eliminate the adverse effect of the void on the footing behavior. The final footing settlement under repeated cyclic loading becomes
about 4 times with respect to the footing settlement under static loading at the same magnitude of load applied.


A. Arabzadeh, R. Aghayari, Ali A. R. Rahai,
Volume 10, Issue 4 (12-2012)
Abstract

Strut-and-Tie Model (STM) can be used to model the flow of compression within a concrete strut. Concrete struts are formed

in various shapes such as prismatic or bottle-shaped. In order to study the behavior of concrete struts, a series of simple tests

were performed. Eighteen reinforced concrete isolated struts with compressive strength of 65 MPa were tested up failure under

point loading in the plane of specimens. The tested specimens were reinforced by various reinforcement layouts. The behavior

of tested beams was investigated. Observations were made on transverse displacement, primary cracking and ultimate failure

load and distribution of strain on the face of tested panels. Based on these observations, the geometry of the concrete struts was

examined. a new model to analysis of concrete struts was proposed based on modified compression field theory (MCFT). A

database of 44 tested specimens was compiled to evaluate the proposed model. The results indicate that using the ACI and CSA

codes expressions regarding the amount of minimum required reinforcement in a strut produces conservative but erratic results

when compared with the test data. Conversely, the new proposed model presents a more accurate prediction for the strength of

44 tested struts.


Wen-Chao Huang,
Volume 12, Issue 3 (7-2014)
Abstract

When geogrid reinforcement is used as a treatment method for improving soft subgrade as a roadway foundation, a top layer of subgrade is usually excavated and backfilled with geogrid-reinforced aggregates. This treatment method produces an adequate platform for the planned roadway construction site, where heavy traffic loading is constantly moving. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of subgrade improvement by geogrid reinforcement based on numerical modelling and parametric studies. First of all, the preliminary numerical models were verified by comparing the analysis results with previous studies. Secondly, the major numerical models in this study were assumed to be a simplified simulation of a geogrid-reinforced two-layer system with an aggregate layer above a subgrade layer. The numerical models were applied a quasi-static loading and unloading cycle, in order to monitor the permanent deformation at the surface of the models. Afterwards, thickness of aggregate layer, and subgrade CBR values were varied in order to summarize the outcomes of each case. This approach makes it possible to quantify the effects of geogrid reinforcement and aggregate material in terms of an enhanced California Bearing Ratio (CBR) of a single subgrade clay layer. Results have shown that when the aggregate thickness is up to 450mm, the contribution of enhanced CBR is mostly from aggregate material. However, when the aggregate thickness is about 150mm with a relatively weak subgrade material, the inclusion of geogrid material can contribute about 50% of the enhanced value.
R. Perumal, K. Nagamani,
Volume 12, Issue 4 (12-2014)
Abstract

An experimental study on the impact performance of silica fume concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete at 28 days and 56 days under the action of repeated dynamic loading was carried out. In this experimental investigation, w/cm ratios of 0.4 and 0.3, silica fume replacement at 10% and 15% and crimped steel fibers with an aspect ratio of 80 were used. Results indicated that addition of fibers in high-performance concrete (HPC) can effectively restrain the initiation and propagation of cracks under stress, and enhance the impact strengths, toughness and ductility of HPC. Pulse velocity test was carried out for quality measurements of high-performance steel fiber reinforced concrete. Steel fibers were observed to have significant effect on flexural strength of concrete. The maximum first crack strength and ultimate failure strength at 28 days were 1.51 times and 1.78 times, respectively at 1.5% volume fraction to that of HPC. Based on the experimental data, failure resistance prediction model was developed with correlation coefficient (R) = 0.96 and absolute variation determined is 1.82%.
Omar Al Hattamleh,
Volume 14, Issue 2 (3-2016)
Abstract

ABSTRACT The influence of the sand placement method above geotextile layer on interface shear strength behavior was investigated. Seven different types of woven and non woven geotextile were used with only poorly graded sand. The investigation involved placement of sand layer through inclined horizontal plane with different angles. This step constitutes a fundamental step for assessing soil to be deposited in different plane and therefore with different internal soil fabric. The interface shear strength was evaluated by using direct shear test. Although the investigated soil is uniform poorly graded sand, the influence of the deposit plane was significant especially for nonwoven geotextile. Differences in soil interface shear strength associated with the tested geotextiles samples shows that samples with higher mass per unit area and same opening sizes had the higher interface friction angle regardless the bedding plane. Influence of bedding plane on interface modulus of elasticity which used in most of interface modeling was investigated using Janbu’s formula. It is noted that the use of secant interface modulus of elasticity at 1% strain and at 50% of peak stresses gave a consistent prediction of n and Ku constant appear in Janbu’s formula for all types of geotextile. The above results were reflected in the prediction for interface molded such as Chen and Juran as shown. Therefore, the existing interface modeled is needed to be modified to account for the method that the sand is being placed above the geotextile layer.


Xiaolei Chen, Jianping Fu, Feng Xue, Xiaofeng Wang,
Volume 15, Issue 4 (6-2017)
Abstract

This paper presents a comparative numerical research on the overall seismic behavior of RC frames with different types of rebars (normal versus high strength rebar). A nonlinear numerical model is developed and is validated using experimental results. Comparing the numerical and experimental behaviors shows that the developed model is capable of describing the hysteretic behavior and plastic hinges development of the experimental RC frames with various strength longitudinal steel bars. The validated model is then used, considering the influences of axial load ratios and volumetric ratios of longitudinal rebars of column, to investigate the effects of reinforcement strength on the overall seismic behavior of RC frames. The simulation results indicate that utilizing high strength reinforcement can improve the structural resilience, reduce residual deformation and achieve favorable distribution pattern of plastic hinges on beams and columns. The frames reinforced with normal and high strength steel bars have comparable overall deformation capacity. The effect of axial load ratio on the energy dissipation, hysteretic curves and ultimate lateral load of frames with different strength rebars is similar. In addition, increasing the volumetric ratios of longitudinal rebars can increase the ultimate lateral load of frame and improve the plastic hinge distribution of frame.


Varol Koç, Yusuf Emiroğlu,
Volume 15, Issue 7 (10-2017)
Abstract

Minimum reinforcement ratios provided in the standards are remaining at very low levels especially at large systems subject to the effects of earthquake. Thus, arranging the reinforcement ratios intended for preliminary design can provide significant ease and safety in project design phase, and speed and simplicity in the project control phase. Moreover, a more realistic limitation becomes ensured compared to general minimum reinforcement ratios given in the standards. System characteristics which may affect the reinforcement ratios can be specified by general and simple parameters. As the result of many extensive studies, expressions for reinforcement ratios intended for preliminary design which will cover systems having different parameters can be composed. Today, thanks to the development levels of finite elements programs which can perform reinforced concrete modeling, meeting this requirement is much more possible compared to the past. Structure of parameters should neither be very special nor very general. Otherwise, reinforcement ratios intended for preliminary design will either be valid for a single system or they will remain at very low limits such as the minimum reinforcement ratios given in the standards. For this reason, in this study it was tried to follow a route in between these two extreme conditions. Today, it is possible to perform many studies on the systems having different and comprehensive inclusive parameters and to determine practical ratios which will constitute a recommendation for the project designs. For this purpose, an eight storey reinforced concrete system with single spacing whose shear wall cross-section is 25x250cm, column cross-section is 25x30cm, and beam cross-section is 25x50cm was addressed, and its non-linear planary analyses under static earthquake loads were performed through the ANSYS finite elements program for 13 different reinforcement case. The reinforcement ratios to be recommended for the addresses system and similar systems were tried to be revealed. The examined system was arranged as to get the most critical and extreme values for many parameters which can be considered, but it was tried for the reinforcement ratios to be recommended to be valid not only for this system but also for the general system network having similar properties to this system. In the future researches, expressions of general and inclusive preliminary design reinforcement ratios can be obtained as per the results of many studies to be made on systems having different parameters.



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