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Showing 3 results for Cyclic Triaxial Test

H. Soltani-Jigheh, A. Soroush,
Volume 8, Issue 2 (6-2010)
Abstract

Mixed clayey soils occur as mixtures of sand (or gravel) and clay in widely varying proportions. Their

engineering behavior has not been comprehensively studied yet. An experimental program, comprising monotonic,

cyclic, and post-cyclic triaxial tests was undertaken on compacted clay-granular material mixtures, having different

proportions of clay and sand or gravel. This paper presents the results of cyclic triaxial tests and explains the behavior

of the mixtures based on number of loading cycles, cyclic strain amplitude, granular material content, grain size, and

effective confining pressure. The results indicate an increase in degree of degradation and cyclic loading-induced pore

water pressure as the number of loading cycles, cyclic strain and granular material content increase. Also the results

show that the grain size has no significant effect on the degree of degradation and cyclic loading-induced pore water

pressure in the specimens. The effect of granular material content on pore water pressure during cyclic loading in

equal-stress-level was also examined. The pore water pressure increases with the increase of granular material

content.


Rouzbeh Dabiri, Faradjollah Askari, Ali Shafiee, Mohammad Kazem Jafari,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

Laboratory data, which relate the liquefaction resistance of Firoozkooh sand and non-plastic silt mixtures to shear wave velocity are

presented and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements by Andrus and Stokoe [1]. In the work

described herein, cyclic triaxial and resonant column tests were conducted on specimens of clean sand and sand-silt mixtures with silt

content up to 60%, prepared at different densities. Cyclic undrained strength and small strain shear wave velocity were determined

for identical specimens formed by undercompaction method. It was found that silt content affects cyclic resistance and shear wave

velocity. In addition, the laboratory results indicated that using the existing field-based correlations will overestimate the cyclic

resistance of the Firoozkooh sand-silt mixtures when silt content is 60%. For clean sand and the specimens containing up to 30% fines,

results of this study on cyclic resistance are fairly consistent with Andrus and Stokoe correlations. These findings suggest the need for

further evaluation of the effects of non-plastic fines content upon liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements.


M. Alibolandi, Dr. R. Ziaie Moayed,
Volume 13, Issue 3 (12-2015)
Abstract

In this study a series of cyclic triaxial tests were performed to examine the undrained dynamic resistance of silty sand reinforced with various arrangements of geotextile layers. The silt content of samples varies in percentage from 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%. A total of 32 laboratory cyclic triaxial tests have been performed on silty sand samples reinforced with geotextile layers in different depths. All tests were performed with 100 kPa confining pressure, subjected to an isotropic consolidated undrained (CIU) condition. The tests were conducted at a frequency of 2 Hz. Results indicate that both the geotextile arrangement and the silt content were most essential in the liquefaction potential of reinforced sands. An increase in the number of geotextile layers enhanced the cyclic resistance of reinforced samples against the liquefaction potential. It was also found that when the geotextile layer was posited near the top of the specimen (load application part) the liquefaction resistance would increase (e.g. for clean sands, the improvement of liquefaction resistance caused by the geotextile layer had a 0.2 depth, and the sample height was 5.5 times greater than the geotextile layer inserted in mid height of sample H). Based on the obtained results, effects of geotextile on liquefaction resistance decreased as fines content increased to about 33%. Further increase in the fines content however, would lead to higher in reinforcement advantages. The liquefaction improvement is more effective with a higher number of geotextile layers. The results also revealed that the reinforcement effect in FC≈33 % is at its lowest amount. 



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