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Showing 4 results for Supply Chain Coordination

M.b Aryanezhad , A. Roghanian ,
Volume 19, Issue 1 (3-2008)
Abstract

Abstract: Bi-level programming, a tool for modeling decentralized decisions, consists of the objective(s) of the leader at its first level and that is of the follower at the second level. Three level programming results when second level is itself a bi-level programming. By extending this idea it is possible to define multi-level programs with any number of levels. Supply chain planning problems are concerned with synchronizing and optimizing multiple activities involved in the enterprise, from the start of the process, such as procurement of the raw materials, through a series of process operations, to the end, such as distribution of the final product to customers.  Enterprise-wide supply chain planning problems naturally exhibit a multi-level decision network structure, where for example, one level may correspond to a local plant control/scheduling/planning problem and another level to a corresponding plant-wide planning/network problem. Such a multi-level decision network structure can be mathematically represented by using “multi-level programming” principles. This paper studies a “bi-level linear multi-objective decision making” model in with “interval” parameters and presents a solution method for solving it this method uses the concepts of tolerance membership function and multi-objective multi-level optimization when all parameters are imprecise and interval .

  


M.b. Aryanezhad , E. M.b.aryanezhad & E.roghanian ,
Volume 19, Issue 1 (3-2008)
Abstract

  Bi-level programming, a tool for modeling decentralized decisions, consists of the objective(s) of the leader at its first level and that is of the follower at the second level. Three level programming results when second level is itself a bi-level programming. By extending this idea it is possible to define multi-level programs with any number of levels. Supply chain planning problems are concerned with synchronizing and optimizing multiple activities involved in the enterprise, from the start of the process, such as procurement of the raw materials, through a series of process operations, to the end, such as distribution of the final product to customers.

  Enterprise-wide supply chain planning problems naturally exhibit a multi-level decision network structure, where for example, one level may correspond to a local plant control/scheduling/planning problem and another level to a corresponding plant-wide planning/network problem. Such a multi-level decision network structure can be mathematically represented by using “multi-level programming” principles. This paper studies a “bi-level linear multi-objective decision making” model in with “interval” parameters and presents a solution method for solving it this method uses the concepts of tolerance membership function and multi-objective multi-level optimization when all parameters are imprecise and interval .

 


Yahia Zare Mehrjerdi, Mehrdad Alipoor,
Volume 27, Issue 4 (12-2016)
Abstract

Abstract Firms no longer compete as autonomous entities and prefer to joinin a supply chain alliance to take advantage of highly competitive business situation. Supply chain coordination has a greatimpact on Firm’sstrategic partnering and success in competitive business environment. In this paper, we propose a system dynamics simulation model for strategic partner selection in supply chain. Our model addresses a supply chain including suppliers and retailers. It presents an approach to simulateeach supplier’s (retailers) tendency to select downstream (upstream) partner selection and the impact of their policies in the whole supply chain.


Javad Asl-Najafi, Saeed Yaghoubi, Amir Azaron,
Volume 29, Issue 4 (12-2018)
Abstract

In recent years, comprehensive researches have provided ample support for the supply chains in the coordinated decision-making framework. However, the issue of closed-loop supply chain coordination considering various transportation modes has not yet been addressed in the literature. In this paper, a two-echelon closed-loop supply chain consisting of a manufacturer and a retailer is investigated in which the manufacturer acts as a Stackelberg leader and the retailer plays follower role. All transportation activities between the channel members are carried out via two transportation types including the economic and green modes. First, the proposed problem is examined under the decentralized and centralized settings. Then, a mathematical modeling is developed to coordinate the decisions related to retail price, collection effort, and ratio of transportation mode selection. Finally, some numerical examples are applied with the aim of analyzing the performance of decentralized, centralized, and coordinated decision-making structures. The results reveal that not only the Pareto optimal solution is achievable for both channel members but also the coordination scheme has sufficient efficiency to reach the best solution up to the centralized setting.

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