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Showing 3 results for Splitting Tensile Strength

A.a. Ramezanianpour, M. Mahdi Khani, Gh. Ahmadibeni,
Volume 7, Issue 2 (6-2009)
Abstract

Rice Husk Ash (RHA) is a by-product of the agricultural industry which contains high amount of silicon dioxide (SiO2). In this research, for the first time in the Middle East, in order to supply typical RHA, a special furnace was designed and constructed in Amirkabir University of Technology. Afterwards, XRD and XRF techniques were used to determine the amorphous silica content of the burnt rice husk. Attempts were made to determine the optimum temperature and duration of burning. Results show that temperature of 650 degrees centigrade and 60 minutes burning time are the best combination. Then various experiments were carried out to determine properties of concretes incorporating optimum RHA. Tests include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modules of elasticity, water permeability and rapid chloride permeability test. Results show that concrete incorporating RHA had higher compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity at various ages compared with that of the control concrete. In addition, results show that RHA as an artificial pozzolanic material has enhanced the durability of RHA concretes and reduced the chloride diffusion.
P. Ramadoss,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (3-2014)
Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents the influence of adding steel fibers and incorporation of silica fume on the mechanical properties of high-strength concrete. The variables investigated were steel fiber volume fraction (0 to 1.5%), silica fume replacement (5, 10 and 15%) and water-to-binder ratio (0.25, 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40). The influence of fiber content in terms of fiber reinforcing index on the compressive and splitting tensile strengths of high-strength steel fiber reinforce concrete (HSFRC) is presented. The use of silica fume increased both the compressive and splitting tensile strengths of concrete at 28 days. On the other hand, the addition of crimped steel fiber into high-strength concrete improves splitting tensile strength significantly. Based on the test data, using regression analysis, empirical expression to predict 28-day tensile strength of HSFRC in terms of fiber reinforcing index was developed and the absolute variation and integral absolute error (IAE) obtained was 3.1% and 3.3, respectively. The relationship between splitting tensile and compressive strength of SFRC was reported with regression coefficient (r) = 0.9. The experimental values of previous researchers were compared with the values predicted by the model and found to predict the values quite accurately.
Mustafa Sarıdemir, Serhat__celikten@hotmail.com Metin Hakan Severcan, Murat Çiflikli, Serhat Çelikten,
Volume 15, Issue 2 (3-2017)
Abstract

In this study, the effects of high temperatures on the mechanical and microstructural properties of high strength concretes (HSCs) made with metakaolin (MK) are investigated. For this purpose, the concrete mixtures made with MK were produced with water-binder ratio of 0.2. The mechanical properties of these concretes at 25, 250, 500 and 750 oC temperatures were determined. Besides, the effect of high temperature on the microstructural changes of cementitious matrix, interfaces between aggregate particles-cementitious materials and aggregates of these concretes were inspected by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and plane polarized transmitted light (PPTL) analyses. The results indicate that the ultrasound pulse velocity, compressive strength, flexural strength and splitting tensile strength values of these concretes decrease especially depending on the increase of the high temperature after 250 oC. The heated concrete specimens were also examined at both macro and micro scales to determine the discoloration, alteration and cracks of HSC at different temperatures. PPTL analyses show that increasing temperature cause impairing of interfaces between aggregate particles and cementitious materials. The results also show that the partial replacement of MK with cement has the best performance on the mechanical properties of HSC.



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