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Showing 9 results for Excess Pore Water Pressure

Baziar M.h., Ziaie Moayed R.,
Volume 1, Issue 1 (9-2003)
Abstract

An experimental study was carried out to evaluate the influence of silt content on cone penetration measurements and its implication for soil classification. The investigation includes twenty-seven peizocone tests in saturated salty sand samples, which had been prepared in a big rigid thick walled steel cylinder-testing chamber. The samples were prepared with several different silt contents ranging from 0 to 50 percent and were consolidated at three-overburden effective stresses including 100, 200 and 300 kPa. This study showed that, the amount of silt content in sand is an important parameter affecting CPT results. As the silt content increases, the cone tip resistance decreases. The recorded excess pore water pressure during sounding was increased with increasing silt content. It is also concluded that friction ratio, in general, increases with increasing silt content. The method presented by Robertson and Wride [25] and Olsen [17] to evaluate soil classification are also verified.
Soroush A., Koohi Sh.,
Volume 2, Issue 4 (12-2004)
Abstract

Lateral spreading of liquefied saturated sandy deposits happens during and shortly afterearthquakes. This paper first reviews this phenomenon by means of reviewing and comparingobservations on case histories and experimental works. Based on the results from the review andcomparison, a mechanism for describing lateral spreading will be suggested. The Finn model,adopted in the Computer code FLAC is employed to carry out numerical analyses of lateralspreading of the Wildlife Site, happened during the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake. First themodel is calibrated by means of numerical analysis of the first centrifuge model test of theVELACS Project. For the Wildlife site, three types of analysis are carried out: a) coupledliquefaction-consolidation analysis using the coefficient of permeability (K1) of the liquefiedlayers, as reported in the literature b) analysis type (a), but with K equal to 0.1K1, and c) a fullyundrained liquefaction analysis. The analyses results, in forms of excess pore water pressures andsurface displacements, indicated that the fully undrained behavior of the liquefied layers betterrepresents the behavior and response of the site during the earthquake.
Mohammad Hassan Baziar, Habib Shahnazari, Hassan Sharafi,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

This paper discusses the applicability of a simple model to predict pore water pressure generation in non-plastic silty soil during

cyclic loading. Several Stress-controlled cyclic hollow torsional tests were conducted to directly measure excess pore water pressure

generation at different levels of cyclic stress ratios (CSR) for the specimens prepared with different silt contents (SC=0% to 100%).

The soil specimens were tested under three different confining pressures (&sigma'3= 60, 120, 240 kPa) at a constant relative density

(Dr=60%), with different silt contents. Results of these tests were used to investigate the behavior of silty sands under undrained

cyclic hollow torsional loading conditions. In general, beneficial effects of the silt were observed in the form of a decrease in excess

pore water pressure and an increase in the volumetric strain. Modified model for pore water pressure generation model based on

the test results are also presented in this paper. Comparison of the proposed pore pressure build up model with seed’s model

indicates the advantage of proposed model for soil with large amount of silt.


J. Jalili, M. K. Jafari, A. Shafiee, J. Koseki, T. Sato,
Volume 10, Issue 2 (6-2012)
Abstract

A series of tests and also numerical analyses were conducted to explore the mechanical behavior of a mixture of coarse gravelsize
particles floating in a matrix of silt, sand or clay. The research is a step forward in an ongoing investigation on behavior of
composite clay, which is used as the core material of some large embankment dams all over the world. After providing the reader
with an overall image about behavior of such materials through the literature, the paper focuses on a predominant feature of the
composite soil behavior: increase of non-deformable solid inclusions in a mixture leads to formation of heterogeneity of stress
field, excess pore water pressure and strain distribution along the specimens. This paper mainly probes formation of such
heterogeneity by the aid of special experiments and also numerical analyses. In addition to loading details, it is clarified through
the paper that position of inclusions relative to loading direction also affects heterogeneity of stress/strain and excess pore water
pressure distribution through the mixture. Despite the former, the latter redistributes with a rate proportional to material
hydraulic conductivity.


A. H. Eghbali, K. Fakharian,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Portland cement can be mixed with sand to improve its mechanical characteristics. Many studies are reported in literature on this topic, but the effect of principal stress rotation has not been investigated yet. Considering the inherent anisotropy of most sands, it is not clear whether the added cement shall contribute to equal increase in strength and stiffness at vertical and horizontal directions or not. Furthermore, it is not well understood how the cement as an additive in non-compacted (loose) sand compared to compacted (dense) sand without cement, contribute to improving the material behavior in undrained condition such as limiting the deformations and the liquefaction potential. In this research, undrained triaxial and simple shear tests under different stress paths are carried out on different mixtures of Portland cement (by adding 1.5, 3 and 5 percent) with clean sand to investigate the effect of principal stress rotations. The triaxial test results revealed that the cement mixture reduces the anisotropy, while it improves the mixture mechanical properties compared to compacted sand without cement. The results of the simple shear tests validated the triaxial test results and further clarified the effect of the  parameter or rotation of principal stresses on the behavior of cemented sand mixtures.
S.h.r. Kargar, H. Shahnazari, H. Salehzadeh,
Volume 12, Issue 4 (12-2014)
Abstract

In this study, a researching program is conducted by cyclic triaxial test to determine the post-cyclic behavior of Bushehr carbonate sand retrieved from the north of the Persian Gulf, under anisotropic consolidation at 200 kPa confining pressure. The article compares the post-cyclic monotonic strength and excess pore water pressures generated after the test with the pre-cyclic monotonic results. The results attest to the existence of a relationship between CSR (Cyclic Stress Ratio) and the frequency of failure cycles. The article also investigates the relationship between the amount of excess pore pressures generated during both the cyclic and post-cyclic loading, revealing an increase in the post-cyclic strength and stiffness of sand retrieved from Bushehr. Also the effect of multi stages cyclic loading, density, pore pressure and stain history in post cyclic strength and stiffness is evaluated. The increasing in post cyclic strength and stiffness depends on excess pore pressure generated during cyclic loading and stain history. This article also reveals that a distinct trend in the relation between post cyclic behavior and crushing value does not exist at lower confining pressure.


Behrooz Mehrzad, Abdolhosein Haddad, Yaser Jafarian,
Volume 14, Issue 2 (3-2016)
Abstract

Currently, there is no reliable design procedure which considers all aspects of liquefaction effects on shallow foundations. There are many light and heavy structures resting on saturated sand with high liquefaction potential in seismic areas. The aim of this experimental and numerical study is to evaluate the performance of two shallow foundations with different contact pressures in liquefaction. The results of the centrifuge experiment of shallow foundations with surcharges of three-story and nine-story buildings on liquefiable sand are presented in detail. Although entire soil profile liquefied, no liquefaction observed under the foundations. There was a clear difference in settlement mechanisms observed beneath the shallow foundation and in the free-field. The heavy foundation fluctuated more strongly compared with the lighter one. The effect of soil permeability and contact pressure on foundation response was investigated during numerical study. The experiment was simulated two dimensionally using a fully coupled nonlinear constitutive model (UBCSAND) implemented in a finite difference program, FLAC-2D. The results show that settlement of foundations increased with the increase of soil permeability. Trends of excess pore water pressure were captured reasonably by the soil model, but the settlement mechanisms were different. The soil model underestimated total liquefaction-induced settlement of shallow foundation, especially for light foundation.



Volume 14, Issue 4 (6-2016)
Abstract

Complete recognition of calcareous sediments engineering behavior considering their local expansion and wide variety of engineering properties is very important. In south parts of Iran, there are some carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs which are covered by calcareous deposits. Hormuz Island in is one of the most strategic areas in Hormuz Strait between Persian Gulf and Oman Sea. In this study, a series of undrained monotonic and cyclic simple shear tests was performed on saturated Hormuz calcareous sand specimens using hollow cylinder torsional apparatus. The tests were carried out on specimens with various relative densities under different effective consolidation stresses. Based on the results, pore pressure generation, shear strain development, stress-strain characteristics of the specimens are presented and compared with the technical literature. In addition, dissipation of strain-based energy during the cyclic loading and its relation to excess pore water pressure is described. The cyclic resistance curves of specimens with different initial conditions are plotted. Also the results of monotonic and cyclic tests are compared together for better interpretation of Hormuz calcareous sand under undrained torsional loading.



Volume 15, Issue 6 (9-2017)
Abstract

In this study, an assessment to excess pore water pressure generated around a single pile and pile group excited by two opposite rotary machines embedded in saturated sandy soil was considered experimentally. A small-scale physical model was manufactured to accomplish the experimental work in the laboratory. The physical model consists of: two small motors supplied with eccentric mass of 0.012 kg and eccentric distance (20 mm) representing the two opposite rotary machines, an aluminum shaft 20 mm in diameter as the pile, and a steel plate with dimensions of (160 × 160 × 20 mm) as a pile cap. The experimental work was achieved taking the following parameters into considerations: pile embedment depth ratio (L/d), spacing between piles (S) and operating frequency of the rotary machines. Twelve tests were conducted in medium dense fine sandy soil with 60 % relative density. In all these tests, the change in excess pore water pressure was measured around the pile at two spots: at the middle of the pile and at its tip. The results revealed that the generation of excess pore water pressure was affected by the following parameters: slenderness ratio of the pile, operating frequency of the machines, and the soil permeability. However, for all cases, it was found that the pore water pressure generated during operation was not greater than 20 % of the initial hydrostatic pressure. Using pile foundation reduced the amplitude of vertical vibration by about (300 %) for all operating frequencies, lengths of piles, pile spacings and number of piles. In addition, the presence of piles reduced the disturbance (fluctuation) in this amplitude by about (400 %). For single pile, and under the same operating frequency, a small decrease in the amplitude of vertical vibration resulted from increasing the length of the pile.



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