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Showing 4 results for Discrete Element Method

S. Mohammadi, A. Bebamzadeh,
Volume 4, Issue 4 (12-2006)
Abstract

Explosion has always been regarded as one of the most complicated engineering problems. As a result, many engineers have preferred rather simplified empirical approaches in comparison to extremely complex deterministic analyses. In this paper, however, a numerical simulation based on the combined finite/discrete element methodology is presented for analyzing the dynamic behavior of fracturing rock masses in blasting. A finite element discretization of discrete elements allows for complex shapes of fully deformable discrete elements with geometric and material nonlinearities to be considered. Only a Rankine strain softening plasticity model is employed, which is suitable for rock and other brittle materials. Creation of new lines/edges/bodies from fracturing and fragmentation of original objects is systematically considered in the proposed gas-solid interaction flow model. An equation of state is adopted to inexpensively calculate the pressure of the detonation gas in closed form. The model employed for the flow of detonation gas has resulted in a logical algorithmic procedure for the evaluation of spatial distribution of the pressure of detonation gas, work done by the expanding gas and the total mass of the detonation gas as functions of time indicating the ability of model to respond to changes in both the mass of explosive charge and the size of the solid block undergoing fracture. Rock blasting and demolition problems are amongst the engineering applications that are expected to benefit directly from the present development. The results of this study may also be used to provide some numerical based reliable solutions for the complex analysis of structures subjected to explosive loadings.
A. R. Majidi, A.a. Mirghasemi, M. Arabshahi,
Volume 9, Issue 4 (12-2011)
Abstract

In the current study, an effort is made to determine three dimensional bearing capacity of rectangular foundations using Discrete

Element Method. The soil mass is modeled as discrete blocks connected with Winkler springs. Different factors affect the geometry

of failure surface. Six independent angles are used to define the failure surface. By trial and error, the optimum shape of failure

surface beneath the foundation can be found. The paper includes the derivation of the governing equations for this DEM based

formulation in three dimensional state as well as parametric sensitivity analyses and comparison with other methods. Moreover,

using the current method, bearing capacity coefficients are presented for various friction angles and foundation aspect ratios.


Y.y. Chang, C.j. Lee, W.c. Huang, W.j. Huang, M.l. Lin, W.y. Hung, Y. H. Lin,
Volume 11, Issue 2 (11-2013)
Abstract

This study presents a series of physical model tests and numerical simulations using PFC2D (both with a dip slip angle=60° and

a soil bed thickness of 0.2 m in model scale)at the acceleration conditions of 1g, 40g, and 80 g to model reverse faulting. The soil

deposits in prototype scale have thicknesses of 0.2 m, 8 m, and 16 m, respectively. This study also investigates the evolution of a

surface deformation profile and the propagation of subsurface rupture traces through overlying sand. This study proposes a

methodology for calibrating the micromechanical material parameters used in the numerical simulation based on the measured

surface settlements of the tested sand bed in the self-weight consolidation stage. The test results show that steeper surface slope

on the surface deformation profile, a wider shear band on the major faulting-induced distortion zone, and more faulting appeared

in the shallower depths in the 1-g reverse faulting model test than in the tests involving higher-g levels. The surface deformation

profile measured from the higher-g physical modeling and that calculated from numerical modeling show good agreement. The

width of the shear band obtained from the numerical simulation was slightly wider than that from the physical modeling at the

same g-levels and the position of the shear band moved an offset of 15 mm in model scale to the footwall compared with the results

of physical modeling.


R. Abbasnia, M. Aslami,
Volume 13, Issue 3 (9-2015)
Abstract

A new model is proposed for two-dimensional simulation of the concrete fracture in compression. The model generated by using the Voronoi diagram method and with considering random shape and distribution of full graded aggregates at the mesoscopic level. The aggregates modeled by combining irregular polygons, which then is placed into the concrete with no intersection between them. By this new modeling approach, the simulation of high-strength concretes with possible aggregates fracture is also feasible. After generation of the geometrical model, a coupled explicit discrete element method and a modified rigid body spring model have been used for solution. In this method, all the neighboring elements are connected by springs. The mortar springs have Elasto-plastic behavior and considering normal concrete, the aggregate springs behave only elastically without any fracture. The proposed model can accurately predict the mechanical behavior of concrete under compression for small and large deformations both descriptively and quantitatively

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