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Showing 2 results for Cutoff Wall

M. Naderi,
Volume 3, Issue 1 (3-2005)
Abstract

Having observed the costly failures of different cutoff walls, that had been constructed according to the mix design specified by reputable consultants in Iran, a research programme was conducted to study the effects of constituent materials on the properties of plastic concrete. The main properties, such as compressive strength, biaxial and triaxial strains, permeability, and modulus of elasticity have been investigated using different mixes, obtained from prototype production line plant, situated on site, because it was realized that the site production line and the systems employed have major effects on the properties of plastic concrete. Statistical analysis of the results, revealed the coefficients of influence of main constituent materials of plastic concrete namely cement, bentonite, aggregate and water on its compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. Having realized the cancelling effects of bentonite and aggregates on the measured properties, some equations relating the quantities of cement and water to the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity are introduced. Effects of clay and hydrated lime powder, as fillers were also investigated leading to the proposal of limits for their safe and economic use. Since most of the cutoff walls are buried structures, failure strains under both uniaxial and triaxial tests, with values of cohesion and internal friction, are also presented in this paper.
H. Khalili Shayan, E. Amiri-Tokaldany,
Volume 13, Issue 4 (12-2015)
Abstract

Upstream blankets, drains and cutoff walls are considered as effective measures to reduce seepage, uplift pressure and exit gradient under the foundation of hydraulic structures. To investigate the effectiveness of these measures, individually or in accordance with others, a large number of experiments were carried out on a laboratory model. To extend the investigation for unlimited arrangements, the physical conditions of all experiments were simulated with a mathematical model. Having compared the data obtained from experiments with those provided from the mathematical model, a good correlation was found between the two sets of data indicating that the mathematical model could be used as a useful tool for calculating the effects of various measures on designing hydraulic structures. Based on this correlation a large number of different inclined angles of cutoff walls, lengths of upstream blankets, and various positions of drains within the mathematical model were simulated. It was found that regardless of their length, the blankets reduce seepage, uplift pressure and exit gradient. However, vertical cutoff walls are the most effective. Moreover, it was found that the best positions of a cutoff wall to reduce seepage flow and uplift force are at the downstream and upstream end, respectively. Also, having simulated the effects of drains, it was found that the maximum reduction in uplift force takes place when the drain is positioned at a distance of 1/3 times the dam width at the downstream of the upstream end. Finally, it was indicated that the maximum reduction in exit gradient occurs when a drain is placed at a distance of 2/3 times of the dam width from upstream end or at the downstream end.



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