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Showing 4 results for Sun

Sung-Hoon An, Hunhee Cho, Ung-Kyun Lee,
Volume 9, Issue 1 (March 2011)
Abstract

In the early stages of a construction project, the reliability and accuracy of conceptual cost estimates are major concerns for clients and cost engineers. Previous studies applied scoring methods and established common rules or mathematical methods to assess the quality of cost estimates. However, those approaches have some limitations in adapting to real-world projects or require understanding of sophisticated statistical techniques. We propose a Conceptual Cost Estimate Reliability Index (CCERI), a simple, easy-to-use, and easy-to-understand tool that incorporates weights for 20 factors influencing the quality of conceptual cost estimates. The weights were obtained by eliciting experts’ experience and knowledge. Cost data from 71 building projects were used in the analysis and validation of the CCERI. The analysis reveals that a conceptual cost estimate with a CCERI score of less than 3000 has a high probability of exceeding 10% error, and such conceptual cost estimates are unlikely to be reliable. With the CCERI score, a decision maker or a client can recognize the reliability of the conceptual cost estimates and the score can thus support decision making using conceptual cost estimates. In addition, with the CCERI and the relative importance weights of factors affecting the conceptual cost estimates, the estimator can find ways to modify a conceptual cost estimate and reestimate it. These alternatives can decrease the risk in the conceptual estimated cost and assist in the successful management of a construction project.
H. Zhou, L.m. Sun,
Volume 11, Issue 3 (Transaction A: Civil Engineering, September 2013)
Abstract

Damping of a full-scale cable with a pair of passive–on magnetorheological (MR) dampers was tested. A cable of 215.58m long with the first mode frequency of 0.658Hz was tensioned horizontally in cable prefabrication factory. Two MR dampers were attached to the cable in an angle in the plane perpendicularly to the cable axis in 5m length from the cable anchorage. The applied voltage level was 0V, 3V, 6V and 9V. The cable was excited manually to a certain amplitude level for the first three modes of vertical vibration. The free decay curves of the cable were then recorded. The damping of the cable was calculated from the measured anti-node vibration amplitude. The damping of the free cable was also tested for reference. It was found that the damping of the cable is still low when MR dampers were no voltage strengthened. However, the damping of the cable increased greatly for the other with MR damper cases compared to free cable. Further study showed that the damping of the cable with MR dampers were strongly depended on applied voltage level and vibration amplitude. There is an optimal damping value when MR damper is voltage strengthened. The dependence of the optimum damping on applied voltage level, vibration amplitude and vibration mode was further analyzed.
Jui-Chao Kuo, Teng-Yi Kuo, Cheng-Han Wu, Shih-Heng Tung, Ming-Hsiang Shih , Wen-Pei Sung, Weng-Sing Hwang,
Volume 12, Issue 2 (Transaction A: Civil Engineering, June 2014)
Abstract

In this study digital image correlation (DIC) technique combined with a high speed video system was used to predict movement of particles in a water model. Comparing with Particle-image velocimetry (PIV) technique, it provides a low cost alternative approach to visualize flow fields and was successfully employed to predict the movement of particles in a water model at different submergence depth using gas injection. As the submergence depth increases, the number of the exposed eye is reduced accordingly. At 26.4 cm submergence depth, an exposed eye was found at 1/3 of the submergence depth, whereas two exposed eyes were observed at 1/2 depth and near the bottom wall at 24 cm submergence depth.
Changjie Xu, Yuanlei Xu, Honglei Sun,
Volume 13, Issue 2 (Transaction B: Geotechnical Engineering June 2015)
Abstract

In soft soil areas, equal-length piles are often adopted in the retaining system. A decrease in the bending moment value borne by the retaining structure along the pile depth (below the excavation bottom), leads to an inadequate use of the pile bending capacity near the pile bottom. This paper presents retaining systems with long and short pile combinations, in which the long piles ensure integral stability of the excavation while the short piles give full play to bearing the bending moment. For further analysis on pile and bottom heaves deformations and inner-force characteristics, three-dimensional models were built in order to simulate the stage construction of the excavation. The ratio between long and short pile numbers, and the effects on short pile length pile horizontal deformation, pile bending moment and bottom heave are investigated in detail. In the end, a feasible long-short pile combination is established. Obtained results from the simulation data and the field data prove that the long-short pile retaining system is feasible.

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