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Showing 5 results for Wetting

A. Gharachorlou, Dr. A.a. Ramezanianpour ,
Volume 8, Issue 4 (12-2010)
Abstract

The use of epoxy-bonded FRPcomposite for structural repair is emerging as an efficient and cost-effective technique for restoring and upgrading the capacity of concrete structures. Considerable researches have been reported in the last decades on the mechanical behavior and failure modes of the FRPstrengthened RC elements but actual data on its durability are scarce. This study intends to examine the durability of concrete specimens strengthened with FRP laminates under accelerated laboratory conditions and mimic harsh environmental situation which is the penetration of chloride ions. In this study three groups of specimens were examined. Each of these groups includes several concrete cylindrical specimens full confined with FRP laminates for investigating different types of fiber (Glass and Carbon), number of fiber layers and temperature influences. Furthermore, an apparatus was fabricated to simulate wetting and drying cycles for the second group of specimens. Moreover group III specimens were placed in a marine environment for 3 years to monitor their performance. Test results show that addition of FRP laminates reduces chloride ions penetration up to 70 percent. Results also indicate that although chloride ions penetration decreased the ultimate strength of cylindrical specimens up to 11 percent but FRP strengthened specimens achieved their initial strengths. Moreover wetting and drying cycles reduced the strength of cylinder specimens up to about ten percent especially in the high temperature laboratory condition.


R. Mahin Roosta, A. Alizadeh,
Volume 10, Issue 2 (6-2012)
Abstract

In the first impounding of rockfill dams, additional settlements occur in upstream side in saturated rockfills due to collapse
phenomenon even high rainy seasons can cause additional deformation in the dumped rockfills. Unfortunately these
displacements are not taken into account in the conventional numerical models which are currently used to predict embankment
dam behavior during impounding. In this paper to estimate these displacements, strain hardening-strain softening model in Flac
is modified based on the laboratory tests, in which same impounding process in such dams is considered. Main feature of the
model is reproduction of nonlinear behavior of rockfill material via mobilized shear strength parameters and using collapse
coefficient to display induced settlement due to inundation. This mobilization of shear strength parameters associated with some
functions for dilatancy behavior of rockfill are used in a finite difference code for both dry and wet condition of material. Collapse
coefficient is defined as a stress dependent function to show stress release in the material owing to saturation. To demonstrate
how the model works, simulation of some large scale triaxial tests of rockfill material in Gotvand embankment dam is presented
and results are compared with those from laboratory tests, which are in good agreement. The technique could be used with any
suitable constitutive law in other coarse-grained material to identify collapse settlements due to saturation


Jose Bogas, Augusto Gomes,
Volume 12, Issue 2 (6-2014)
Abstract

This paper aims to characterize the elastic modulus of structural modified normal density (MND) and lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC) produced with different types of expanded clay lightweight aggregates (LWA). A comprehensive experimental study was carried out involving different concrete strengths ranging from 30 to 70 MPa and density classes D1.6 to D2.0. The influence of several factors on the LWAC elastic modulus, such as the cement content, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of coarse LWA and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by LWA are analyzed. The strength and deformability of LWAC seems to be little affected by the addition of high reactive nanosilica. Reasonable correlations are found between the elastic modulus and the compressive strength or concrete density. The obtained LWAC elastic moduli are compared with those reported in the literature and those estimated from the main normative documents. In general, codes underestimate the LWAC modulus of elasticity by less than 20%. However, the MND modulus of elasticity can be greatly underestimated. In addition, the prediction of LWAC elastic modulus by means of non-destructive ultrasonic tests is studied. Dynamic elasticity modulus and ultrasonic pulse velocity results are reported and high correlated relationships, over 0.95, with the static modulus are established.
F. Dastjerdy, Dr O.r. Barani, Dr F. Kalantary,
Volume 13, Issue 3 (12-2015)
Abstract

In this paper, a finite element model is developed for the fully hydro-mechanical analysis of hydraulic fracturing in partially saturated porous media. The model is derived from the framework of generalized Biot theory. The fracture propagation is governed by a cohesive fracture model. The flow within the fracture zone is modeled by the lubrication equation. The displacement of solid phase, and the pressure of wetting and non-wetting phases are considered as the main unknown parameters. Other variables are incorporated into the model using empirical relationships between saturation, permeability and capillary pressure. Zero-thickness element and conventional bulk element are used for propagating fracture and the surrounding media, respectively. The model is validated with respect to analytical solution of hydraulic fracture propagation problem in saturated media and then the problem is solved in semi-saturated media, considering the wetting and non-wetting pore fluid. 


A. Allahvedi, H. Hashemi,
Volume 13, Issue 4 (12-2015)
Abstract

This paper presents an investigation on durability of alkali-activated slag mortar against magnesium sulfate attack. To do so, the immersion tests in 5% magnesium sulfate solution under room temperature and wetting-drying cycles were applied. Mortar specimens from Portland cements type 2 and 5 in accordance to ASTM standard were also prepared and used as reference. The changes in compressive strength and length of specimens were measured at different time intervals and considered for evaluating the extent of degradation. After 360 days of exposure to the magnesium sulfate solution, type 2 and 5 Portland cements and alkali-activated slag cement have shown 61, 41 and 34% reduction in compressive strength and 0.093, 0.057 and 0.021% increase in length, respectively. The specimens were also studied by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy for characterizing the chemical products of the degradation process. Main degradation products were ettringite and gypsum for Portland cements and gypsum for alkali-activated slag cement. According to the obtained results, alkali-activated slag cement exhibits a higher sulfate resistance compared to type 2 and even type 5 Portland cements



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