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Showing 11 results for Anisotropy

S.a. Sadrnejad,
Volume 4, Issue 2 (6-2006)
Abstract

An important concern in rock mechanics is non-homogeneity as joints or fault. Adopting the joints as fractures, fractures are well known for their effects on the mechanical and transport properties of rock. It has been postulated that through fractured/jointed rock, mainly, the polygons turned to the shear vector (ti) are involved in the mobilization of shear resistance. Consequently, in order to locate the contact areas implicated into the shear-test it was firstly necessary to fix the shear direction. Moreover, since laboratory observations clearly show that only the steepest polygon surfaces touch the other sample, the identification of the potential sliding areas only requires the determination of the polygons which are faced to the shear direction and which, among them, are steep enough to be involved. The methodology to be discussed here is modeling of slip on the local and global levels due to the distribution of deformation procedure of the rock joint. Upon the presented methodology, more attention has been given to slip initiation and propagation through rock joint. In particular, softening in non-linear behaviour of joint in going from the peak to residual strengths imparts a behaviour often associated with progressive failure. A multi-plane based model is developed and used to compute plastic strain distribution and failure mechanism of rock joints. Validity of the presented model was examined by comparing numerical and test results showing the behavior of both homogeneous and jointed rock samples under general stress conditions.
S.a. Sadrnejad, M. Labibzadeh,
Volume 4, Issue 4 (12-2006)
Abstract

Analysis and prediction of structural response to static or dynamic loading requires prediction of concrete response tovariable load histories. The constitutive equations for the mechanical behavior of concrete capable of seeing damage effects or crack growth procedure under loading/unloading/reloading was developed upon micro-plane framework. The proposed damage formulation has been built on the basis of five fundamental types of stress/strain combinations, which essentially may occur on any of micro-planes. Model verification under different loading/unloading/reloading stress/strain paths has been examined. The proposed model is capable of presenting pre-failure history of stress/strain progress on different predefined sampling planes through material. Many of mechanical behavior aspects happen during plasticity such as induced anisotropy, rotation of principal stress/strain axes, localization of stress/strain, and even failure mechanism are predicted upon a simple rational way and can be presented.
A.a. Khosroshahi, S.a. Sadrnejad,
Volume 5, Issue 1 (3-2007)
Abstract

A framework for development of constitutive models including damage progress, based on semi-micromechanical aspects of plasticity is proposed for concrete. The model uses sub-loading surface with multilaminate framework to provide kinematics and isotropic hardening/softening in the ascending/descending branches of loading and can be able to keep stress/stain paths histories for each plane separately. State of stresses on planes is divided to four basic stress patterns i.e. pure compression, increasing compression-and shear, decreasing compression-shear and tension-shear and used in derivation of plasticity equations. Under this kind of categorized form the model is capable of predicting behavior of concrete under any stress/strain path such as uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial in the monotonic and cyclic loading, Also this model is capable of predicting the effects of principal stress/strain axes rotations and consequent plastic flow and has the potential to simulate the behavior of material with anisotropy, fabric pattern, slip/weak planes and crack opening/closing. The material parameters of model are calibrated by optimum fitting of the basic test data available in the literature. The model results under both monotonic and cyclic loading have been compared with experimental results to show capability of model.
H. Salehzadeh, M. Hassanlourad, D.c. Procter, C.m. Merrifield,
Volume 6, Issue 4 (12-2008)
Abstract

The unique behaviour of carbonate sediments under shear loading has stimulated in investigating of their geological and engineering properties. Their shapes are very different varying from needle shaped to platy shaped. Hence, it is important to examine their fabric effect on soil response under shearing condition. To this aim a series of small scale laboratory element testing were carried out on North Cornwall Rock" beach sand. Non-cemented and cemented Carbonate sand response under compression and extension loading and different initial density and confining pressure with samples allowed to be drained were investigated and compared. The results show that the sand shear strength under Extension loading is lower than compression regarding to anisotropic fabric due to platy and needle shape of grains. The anisotropy is reduced with increasing the confining pressure and initial relative density with non-cemented sand. Furthermore, present of cement bounds reduces the anisotropy especially in low confining pressures.
Alireza Mortezaei, Ali Kheyroddin,
Volume 7, Issue 1 (3-2009)
Abstract

The work presented in this paper investigates the causes of size effects in structural-concrete members. It is

based on the use of a finite-element model found to yield realistic predictions of structural-concrete behavior in all

cases investigated to date. In fact, the previous use of this model in investigations of size effects in reinforced-concrete

beams indicated that such effects reflect the dependence of load-carrying capacity on small unintended eccentricities

of the applied load and/or load-induced anisotropy, rather than, as widely considered, on fracture-mechanics

characteristics. The present work extends the scope of the above investigation so as to include the case of reinforced

concrete flanged shear walls, the behavior of which is already established experimentally. It is found that, unlike the

flanged shear walls with a height-to-length ratio larger than 2, the shear walls investigated in the present work, in

contrast with the interpretation given to recently published experimental findings, are size-effect independent.


S. A. Sadrnejad, S. A. Ghoreishian Amir,
Volume 8, Issue 2 (6-2010)
Abstract

A semi-micromechanical multilaminate model is introduced here to predict the mechanical behavior of soils.

This model is like a bridge between micro and macro scale upon the satisfaction of minimum potential energy level

during any applied stress/strain increments. The concept of this model is based on a certain number of sampling planes

which constitute the elastic-plastic behavior of the soil. The soil behavior presents as the summation of behavior on

these planes. A simple unconventional constitutive equations are used in each of the planes to describe the behavior

of these planes separately. An unconventional plasticity can predict the soil behavior as a smooth curve with

considering plastic deformation due to change of stress state inside the yield surface. The model is capable of

predicting softening behavior of the soil in a reasonable manner due to using unconventional plasticity. The influences

of induced anisotropy are included in a rational way without any additional hypotheses owing to in-nature properties

of the multilaminate framework. Results of this model are compared with test data and reasonable agreement is found.


Seyed Amirodin Sadrnejad, Hamid Karimpour,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

The present paper is devoted to a new critical state based plasticity model able to predict drained and undrained behaviour of

granular material. It incorporates a bounding surface plasticity model describing in multilaminate framework to capitalize on

advantages of this mathematical framework. Most of the models developed using stress/strain invariants are not capable of

identifying the parameters depending on directional effects such as principal stress rotation and fabric this is mainly because

stress/strain invariants are scalar quantities. The principal features of this model can be postulated as considering both inherent

and induced anisotropy, principal stress rotation. Since the local instability of saturated sand within post-liquefaction is highly

dependent on the residual inherent/induced anisotropy, bedding plane effects and also the stress/strain path the new mode is

competent to be employed in this regard. The constitutive equations of the model are derived within the context of non-linear

elastic behaviour for the whole medium and plastic sliding of interfaces of predefined planes. As follows, the constitutive

equations are described in detail and then the experimental results and sensitive analysis of key material constants are shown

which all imply the power of the model in predicting of soil behaviour under any condition in soil structures.


S.a. Sadrnejad, M. Nikbakhsh Zati, M. Memarianfard,
Volume 11, Issue 1 (5-2013)
Abstract

An important concern in rock mechanics is non-homogeneity as joints or fault. This noticeable feature of failures in rock is

appearance of slip surfaces or shear bands, the characteristics of that are associated with deformation being concentrated in a

narrow zones and the surrounding material remaining intact. Adopting the joints as fractures, fractures are well known for their

effects on the mechanical and transport properties of rock. A damaged pro-elasticity multi-plane based model has been developed

and presented to predict rock behavior. In this multi-plane model, the stress–strain behavior of a material is obtained by

integrating the mechanical response of an infinite number of predefined oriented planes passing through a material point.

Essential features such as the pro-elasticity hypothesis and multi-plane model are discussed. The methodology to be discussed

here is modeling of slip on the local and global levels due to the deformation procedure of the existing/probable joints of rock and

this method has a potential of using different parameters on different sampling planes to predict inherent anisotropy of rocks.

Upon the presented methodology, more attention has been given to slip initiation and propagation through these joints. In

particular, softening in non-linear behavior of joints in going from the peak to residual strengths imparts a behavior often

associated with progressive failure. The predictions of the derived stress–strain model are compared to experimental results for

marble, sandstone, Quartz mica schist and anisotropic schist. The comparisons demonstrate the capability of this model to

reproduce accurately the mechanical behavior of rocks.


A. H. Eghbali, K. Fakharian,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Portland cement can be mixed with sand to improve its mechanical characteristics. Many studies are reported in literature on this topic, but the effect of principal stress rotation has not been investigated yet. Considering the inherent anisotropy of most sands, it is not clear whether the added cement shall contribute to equal increase in strength and stiffness at vertical and horizontal directions or not. Furthermore, it is not well understood how the cement as an additive in non-compacted (loose) sand compared to compacted (dense) sand without cement, contribute to improving the material behavior in undrained condition such as limiting the deformations and the liquefaction potential. In this research, undrained triaxial and simple shear tests under different stress paths are carried out on different mixtures of Portland cement (by adding 1.5, 3 and 5 percent) with clean sand to investigate the effect of principal stress rotations. The triaxial test results revealed that the cement mixture reduces the anisotropy, while it improves the mixture mechanical properties compared to compacted sand without cement. The results of the simple shear tests validated the triaxial test results and further clarified the effect of the  parameter or rotation of principal stresses on the behavior of cemented sand mixtures.
M. Karimpour Fard, N. Shariatmadari, M. Keramati, H. Jafari Kalarijani,
Volume 12, Issue 4 (12-2014)
Abstract

Due to the existence of fibrous materials such as plastic fragments, the strength anisotropy of Municipal Solid Waste

(MSW) materials is the main source of differences between their mechanical response in direct shear and triaxial apparatus.

As an extension of earlier research on the mechanical behavior of MSW using a large traixail apparatus, results presented in

Shariatmadari et al. [1] and Karimpour-Fard et al. [2], the current study was programmed and executed. MSW samples were

tested using a computer controlled large shear box apparatus with normal stress levels ranging between 20 to 200 kPa. The

effect of fiber content, fiber orientation, aging and shearing rate on the response of MSW were addressed. The results showed

that shear strength of MSW increases with normal stress, although, in spite of the presence of reinforcement elements in MSW

and unlike the results from triaxial tests, no strain hardening could be observed in their mechanical response. An increase in

the shear strength of MSW was observed with increasing the shearing rate. Increasing the shearing rate from 0.8 to 19

mm/min, enhanced the shear strength of samples from 16 to 27% depending on the shear displacement level. Although, the

same trend was investigated in traixial tests, but lower rate-sensitivity in the mechanical response of MSW in direct shear tests

were observed.

Unlike the results of triaxial tests with aging process, mobilized shear strength level of MSW samples tested under direct

shearing decreased comparing fresh samples. It was also observed that altering the fiber content and their orientation could

affect the mechanical response and shear strength of the MSW. Additionally, there is an optimum fiber angle in MSW which

yields the highest level of shearing strength.


Abdulazim Yildiz, Firdevs Uysal,
Volume 14, Issue 2 (3-2016)
Abstract

This paper investigates the time dependent behaviour of Sunshine embankment on soft clay deposit with and without prefabricated vertical drains. An elasto visco-plastic model was used to investigate the influence of anisotropy and creep effect on the settlement behaviour of the embankment. The constitutive model, namely ACM accounts for combined effects of plastic anisotropy and creep. For comparison, the problem is also analysed with isotropic Modified Cam Clay model which does not consider creep effect. To analyse the PVD-improved subsoil, axisymmetric vertical drains were converted into equivalent plane strain conditions using two different mapping approaches. The results of the numerical analyses are compared with the field measurements. The numerical simulations suggest that the anisotropic creep model is able to give a better representation of soft clay response under an embankment loading. The isotropic model which neglects effects of anisotropy and creep may lead to inaccurate predictions of soft clay response. Additionally, the numerical results show that the mapping method used for PVD improved soft clays can accurately predict the consolidation behaviour of the embankment and provide a useful tool for engineering practice.



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