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Showing 11 results for Retrofit

R. Abbasnia, A. Holakoo,
Volume 10, Issue 3 (9-2012)
Abstract

One important application of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is to confine concrete as FRP jackets in seismic retrofit process

of reinforced concrete structures. Confinement can improve concrete properties such as compressive strength and ultimate axial

strain. For the safe and economic design of FRP jackets, the stress-strain behavior of FRP-confined concrete under monotonic

and cyclic compression needs to be properly understood and modeled. According to literature review, it has been realized that

although there are many studies on the monotonic compressive loading of FRP-confined concrete, only a few studies have been

conducted on the cyclic compressive loading. Therefore, this study is aimed at investigating the behavior of FRP-confined

concrete under cyclic compressive loading. A total of 18 cylindrical specimens of FRP-confined concretewere tested in uniaxial

compressive loading with different wrap thickness, and loading patterns. The results obtained from the tests are presented and

examined based on analysis of test results predictive equations for plastic strain and stress deterioration were derived. The

results are also compared with those from two current models,comparison revealed the lack of sufficient accuracy of the current

models to predict stress-strain behavior and accordingly some provisions should be incorporated.


M. Z. Kabir, A. Hojatkashani,
Volume 10, Issue 4 (12-2012)
Abstract

The aim of current study is to investigate the effect of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites on the fatigue

response of reinforced concrete beams. 6 reinforced concrete (RC) beams from which 3 were retrofitted with CFRP sheets, were

prepared and subjected to fatigue load cycles. To predict and trace the failure occurrence and its growth, a small notch was

induced at the middle span in bottom surface of all RC specimens. At the certain points, strains in concrete and CFRP were

measured in each cycle. The upper limit of applied load was considered at the level of design service load of bridges. In addition,

strain measurements facilitated to the calculation of interfacial shear stresses between concrete substrate and the CFRP layer.

The variation of such stresses through load cycles has been presented and discussed. Also, a discussion on possibility of the local

debonding phenomenon resulted from such interfacial stresses was presented. Load–deflection curves, strain responses and

propagation of tensile cracks provided an insight on the performance of the CFRP strengthened beams subjected to different

cycles of fatigue loading. Variation of load-deflection curves through fatigue load cycles depicted stiffness degradation which

was discussed in the research.


M. Mohamamdi Ghazimahalleh, R. M. Ghazimahalleh,
Volume 11, Issue 3 (9-2013)
Abstract

A new type of infilled frame has been recently proposed. It has a frictional sliding fuse, horizontally installed at the mid-height of the infill. It has already shown that such infilled frames have higher ductility, strength and damping ratio as well as more enhanced hysteresis cycles, compared with regular infilled frames. This experimental paper is focused on the influence of gravitational load on the behaviour of the fused infill panel. Furthermore, a repairing method in which damaged specimens are repaired by grout plasters is also studied. The results show that the gravitational load, applied to the surrounding frame of the infill for the dead or live loads, arises the ultimate strength of the fused infill specimens. It is also shown that repairing the failed specimen by grout was so efficient that the repaired specimen had greater strength than the original one. However, top gap, between the infill and the top beam of the enclosing frame should be absolutely avoided, because it decays the ultimate strength.
S. Karimiyan, A. Moghadam, A. . Husseinzadeh Kashan, M. Karimiyan,
Volume 13, Issue 1 (3-2015)
Abstract

Plan irregularity causes local damages being concentrated in the irregular buildings. Progressive collapse is also the collapse of a large portion or whole building due to the local damages in the structure. The effect of irregularity on the progressive collapse potential of the buildings is investigated in this study. This is carried out by progressive collapse evaluation of the asymmetric mid rise and tall buildings in comparison with the symmetric ones via the nonlinear time history analyses in the 6, 9 and 12 story reinforced concrete buildings. The effect of increasing the mass eccentricity levels is investigated on the progressive collapse mechanism of the buildings with respect to the story drift behavior and the number of beam and column collapsed hinges criteria. According to the results, increasing the mass eccentricity levels causes earlier instability with lower number of the collapsed hinges which is necessary to fail the asymmetric buildings and at the same time mitigates the potential of progressive collapse. Moreover, the decreasing trend of the story drifts of the flexible edges is lower than those of the stiff edges and the mass centers and the amount of decrement in the story drifts of the stiff edges is approximately similar to those of the mass centers.
F. Tootoonchy, B. Asgarian, F. Danesh,
Volume 13, Issue 2 (6-2015)
Abstract

Despite the rapid growth of engineering science especially in the modern structural engineering and application of new materials in civil engineering, a significant percentage of world population in different countries are living in adobe buildings made from mud-bricks. In this paper, by performing experimental study on scaled mud-brick walls under monotonic load, in-plane behavior of the walls have been investigated for different levels of vertical load. After recognizing damage mechanisms from experiment, a simple retrofitting method has been presented to upgrade wall performance. Experimental behavior of retrofitted walls was also studied. The proposed retrofitting method consists of using polypropylene lace and tarpaulin belts. As a result, a better performance of the walls in terms of shear capacity, ductility and energy absorption are observed by using proposed retrofitting method. Meanwhile, Proposed retrofitting method has significant effect in rocking mechanism delay and prevention of wall sudden collapse.
S.m. Zahrai,
Volume 13, Issue 3 (9-2015)
Abstract

Seismic retrofit of masonry slabs in existing steel or masonry buildings has found special significance in current codes as failure of unstable jack arch slabs has been reported as a major reason for collapsing structures in Middle East deadly earthquakes. In this paper, three retrofit schemes are investigated and compared. The proposed rehabilitation techniques consist of a single X strapping, SXS, a double X strapping, DXS, and a two-way jack arch slab supported by a steel grid. Using experimental studies, advantages and disadvantages of each scheme are evaluated. In-plane stiffness and capacity of the diaphragm are adopted as the seismic performance index of each rehabilitation scheme. According to the obtained results, the jack arch slab systems designed and constructed based on proposed retrofit methods provide an appropriate alternative to other forms of flooring in seismic zones. DXS can greatly improve diaphragm performance in terms of in-plane stiffness, capacity and even energy dissipation of the diaphragm compared with the other two techniques. The second place belongs to SXS while the steel grid scheme has a minor effect on the in-plane stiffness of the diaphragm.
V.v. Sakhare, S.p. Raut, S.a. Mandavgane, R.v. Ralegaonkar,
Volume 13, Issue 4 (12-2015)
Abstract

Energy conservation in buildings plays a vital role for sustainable development of societies and nations. Although, newer buildings in developing nations are being constructed using energy conservation approach, existing buildings have higher energy demand to meet the desired comfort. Excessive energy demand for cooling the built environment is a major problem over most of the arid climatic zones. The problem is predominant in all the top storied buildings which are directly under exposed roof condition. In order to reduce the overheating of the roof surface a composite combination of reflecting-cum-insulating (R-I) material was developed. The sustainable materials viz., expanded polystyrene (construction waste), saw dust (industrial waste), and the false ceiling panels prepared from industrial waste were used for the development of sustainable R-I material. The R-I material was retrofitted over the existing roof of a model room in an educational building over composite climate (Nagpur, India) and was analyzed experimentally for the period of a year. The thermal resistance of the overall roof assembly was increased from 0.28 to 0.55 m² K/W, which in turn helped to achieve 16% of the duration of the year under thermal comfort. The developed R-I material has also an advantage of low cost (INR 900 per sq. m.) of installation as well as light weight (50 kg/m²) retrofitting solution. The R-I product can further be applied on larger roof areas by the designers to reduce the cooling load of the built environment as well as increase the occupants comfort over the local climatic zone.


Guray Arslan, Muzaffer Borekci, Muzaffer Balci, Melih Hacisalihoglu,
Volume 14, Issue 3 (4-2016)
Abstract

The contribution of concrete to inelastic deformation capacity and shear strength of reinforced concrete (RC) columns failing in shear has been investigated extensively by various researchers. Although RC members are designed to have shear strengths much greater than their flexural strengths to ensure flexural failure according to the current codes, shear degradation of RC columns failing in flexure has not been studied widely. The aim of this study is to investigate the shear degradation of RC columns using finite element analyses (FEA). The results of FEA are compared with the results of experimental studies selected from literature, and it is observed that the lateral load-deflection curves of analysed columns are compatible with the experimental results. Twenty-six RC columns were analysed under monotonically increasing loads to determine the concrete contribution to shear strength. The results of analyses indicate that increasing the ratio of shear to flexural strength reduces the concrete contribution to shear strength of the columns.


Hynn-Ki Choi,
Volume 14, Issue 6 (9-2016)
Abstract

Replacement of existing unreinforced masonry (URM) walls, commonly used as a non-structural member in apartments, with new reinforced concrete (RC) components has been used as a reliable method when remodeling is carried out. However, special care needs to be taken when URM walls are removed not to waste construction time and materials. Therefore, retrofitting existing URM walls can be deemed a better solution rather than replacing URM walls with RC ones. Using shotcrete is one of retrofitting techniques of URM walls. However, using normal shotcrete cannot improve adequate ductility and may cause brittle failure at a wall-frame or slab connection. Therefore, new materials such as engineered cementitious composite (ECC) and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) have emerged to resolve the problem of normal shotcrete by increasing ductility and toughness of retrofitting materials. In this study, sprayed ECC was used to increase both strength and ductility of existing URM walls. The results of two retrofitted URM walls under lateral quasi-static loading were compared to non-retrofitted one. One strengthened wall, retrofitted masonry wall (RTM)-ECC, was just sprayed and anchored to a wall base. Another strengthened wall, RTM-ECC-WM, was the same as RTM-ECC except for addition of wire mesh. The retrofitted specimens showed significant increase of strength, ductility, and energy dissipation capacity in comparison with the control one. In addition, RTM-ECC-WM indicated better strength degradation due to the load transferring effect of wire mesh than RTM-ECC.


Mahnoosh Biglari, Iman Ashayeri, Mohammad Bahirai,
Volume 14, Issue 6 (9-2016)
Abstract

In this article, general procedures for vulnerability assessment and retrofitting of a generic seismically designed bridge are outlined and the bridge’s damage criteria for blast resistance are explained. The generic concrete bridge is modeled and analyzed with the finite element technique implemented in ANSYS LS-DYNA environment and explosion threats are categorized into three main levels. Uncoupled dynamic technique is adopted to apply the blast loads on the bridge structure, damage and performance levels are resulted based on quantitatively verified damage mechanisms for the bridge members. The results show that, amongst different loading scenarios, the explosions that happen under deck are more critical comparing to blasts initiating from over deck sources. Furthermore, two retrofitting methods 1) concrete filled steel tube (CFST) and 2) concrete jacket are applied on the bridge columns. The program AUTODYN is used with coupled dynamic analysis of a column to compare the effectiveness of each method. Afterward, more efficient method for a column is applied to the whole bridge and its efficiency is revaluated. It is shown that CFST can decrease concrete spall, scabbing, rotation, displacements and shear forces more than the concrete jacket. Considering the proposed damage and performance levels, the bridge retrofitted with CFST reacts with lower damage level and higher performance level to blast loads.


Mohammad Reza Saberi, Alireza Rahai, Masoud Sanayei ,
Volume 15, Issue 1 (1-2017)
Abstract

Steel bridges play a very important role in every country’s transportation system. To ensure that bridges perform reliably, engineers monitor their performance which is referred to as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). An important element of SHM includes the prediction of service life. There is ample historical evidence that bridge damage is pervasive and their life time is decreasing. To manage costs and safety, service life prediction of bridges is necessary. We present a statistical method to predict service life for steel bridges. A nonparametric statistical model based on the bootstrap method for stress analysis for fatigue life prediction of steel girder bridges is proposed. The bootstrap provides a simple approach for reproduction of the probability distribution of measured strain data. The bootstrap is sensitive to the number of events in the verification sample (data), thus we introduce a stable survival distribution function (SDF). An index is presented in this paper for inferring the service life of steel bridges, which can be known as the Life Index (µ). The life index function shows variation of the age of steel bridges under daily traffic loads. A regression model is developed which relates the service life of steel bridges using a bridge life index based on measured operational strain time histories. The predicted remaining service life derived from the model can contribute to effective management of steel bridges. The proposed method assists bridge engineers, bridge owners, and state officials in objective assessment of deteriorated bridges for retrofit or replacement of deteriorated bridges. Timely repair and retrofit increase the safety levels in bridges and decrease costs.



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