Search published articles


Showing 15 results for Liquefaction

Baziar M.h., Asna Ashari M.,
Volume 2, Issue 3 (9-2004)
Abstract

An experimental study was carried out to evaluate the liquefaction resistance of silty sand utilizing laboratory techniques. In this study, liquefaction potential of silty sand by using cyclic triaxial tests on frozen samples retrieved from calibration chamber and constructed samples by dry pouring method were investigated. Correlation between cone penetration resistance and cyclic strength of undisturbed silty sand samples are also examined using CPT calibration chamber and cyclic triaxial tests. The cone penetration tests were performed on silty sand samples with fine contents ranging from 0% to 50% and overburden stresses in the range of 100-300 kPa. Then the soil sample in calibration chamber, in the same way that soil samples were prepared during CPT sounding, was frozen and undisturbed soil specimen retrieved from frozen soil sample were tested using cyclic triaxial tests. Analysis of results indicates that the quality of frozen samples is affected by fine content and overburden pressures. Also, using data obtained in this research, the relationship between cone tip resistance and cyclic resistance ratio (CRR) for silty sand soils will be presented. These correlations are in relatively good agreement with field case history data. Also increasing confining pressure in silty sand material increases the cone tip resistance and generally, cyclic resistance ratio increases by increasing silt content.
Soroush A., Koohi Sh.,
Volume 2, Issue 4 (12-2004)
Abstract

Lateral spreading of liquefied saturated sandy deposits happens during and shortly afterearthquakes. This paper first reviews this phenomenon by means of reviewing and comparingobservations on case histories and experimental works. Based on the results from the review andcomparison, a mechanism for describing lateral spreading will be suggested. The Finn model,adopted in the Computer code FLAC is employed to carry out numerical analyses of lateralspreading of the Wildlife Site, happened during the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake. First themodel is calibrated by means of numerical analysis of the first centrifuge model test of theVELACS Project. For the Wildlife site, three types of analysis are carried out: a) coupledliquefaction-consolidation analysis using the coefficient of permeability (K1) of the liquefiedlayers, as reported in the literature b) analysis type (a), but with K equal to 0.1K1, and c) a fullyundrained liquefaction analysis. The analyses results, in forms of excess pore water pressures andsurface displacements, indicated that the fully undrained behavior of the liquefied layers betterrepresents the behavior and response of the site during the earthquake.
H. Salehzadeh, D.c. Procter, C.m. Merrifield,
Volume 4, Issue 1 (3-2006)
Abstract

Carbonate materials are mostly found in tropical areas, where exploiting gas and oil resources are of high concern. Their unique behavior under shear loading first was recognised during oil resources investigations in the Persian Gulf. Off-shore structures have been placed on carbonate soils which are highly crushable.During storms cyclic loading imposes on the bases of structures lied down on seabed. Cyclic loading, therefore, may trigger liquefaction phenomenon which leads to soil collapse and a catostrophic event. Therefore, stability of these expensive structures need to be investigated. To this aim carbonate sand in medium dense to medium dense state was considered and its response under varied cyclic shear stress ratio was studied.
M.h. Baziar, R. Ziaie_moayed,
Volume 4, Issue 2 (6-2006)
Abstract

This paper highlights the effect of silt content on cone tip resistance in loose silty sand. In this study, twenty-seven cone penetration tests are performed in saturated silty sand samples with several different silt contents ranging from 10 to 50 percent. The samples are consolidated at three overburden stresses including 100, 200 and 300 kPa. It is shown that, as the silt content increases, the cone tip resistance decreases. In high percent of silt (30-50%), the cone tip resistance decreases more gently compared with low percent of silt (0-30%). It is also concluded that the method proposed by Olsen (1997) for stress normalization of cone tip resistance compared with the Robertson and Wride (1998) method has better agreement with the obtained results. To evaluate liquefaction potential of loose silty sand, the method presented by Robertson and Wride (1998) is also studied. The results showed that the use of Robertson and Wride (1998) method to estimate the fine content from CPT data causes some uncertainty especially for high silt content (FC>30%).
Seyed Amirodin Sadrnejad, Hamid Karimpour,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

The present paper is devoted to a new critical state based plasticity model able to predict drained and undrained behaviour of

granular material. It incorporates a bounding surface plasticity model describing in multilaminate framework to capitalize on

advantages of this mathematical framework. Most of the models developed using stress/strain invariants are not capable of

identifying the parameters depending on directional effects such as principal stress rotation and fabric this is mainly because

stress/strain invariants are scalar quantities. The principal features of this model can be postulated as considering both inherent

and induced anisotropy, principal stress rotation. Since the local instability of saturated sand within post-liquefaction is highly

dependent on the residual inherent/induced anisotropy, bedding plane effects and also the stress/strain path the new mode is

competent to be employed in this regard. The constitutive equations of the model are derived within the context of non-linear

elastic behaviour for the whole medium and plastic sliding of interfaces of predefined planes. As follows, the constitutive

equations are described in detail and then the experimental results and sensitive analysis of key material constants are shown

which all imply the power of the model in predicting of soil behaviour under any condition in soil structures.


Rouzbeh Dabiri, Faradjollah Askari, Ali Shafiee, Mohammad Kazem Jafari,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

Laboratory data, which relate the liquefaction resistance of Firoozkooh sand and non-plastic silt mixtures to shear wave velocity are

presented and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements by Andrus and Stokoe [1]. In the work

described herein, cyclic triaxial and resonant column tests were conducted on specimens of clean sand and sand-silt mixtures with silt

content up to 60%, prepared at different densities. Cyclic undrained strength and small strain shear wave velocity were determined

for identical specimens formed by undercompaction method. It was found that silt content affects cyclic resistance and shear wave

velocity. In addition, the laboratory results indicated that using the existing field-based correlations will overestimate the cyclic

resistance of the Firoozkooh sand-silt mixtures when silt content is 60%. For clean sand and the specimens containing up to 30% fines,

results of this study on cyclic resistance are fairly consistent with Andrus and Stokoe correlations. These findings suggest the need for

further evaluation of the effects of non-plastic fines content upon liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements.


Mohammad Hassan Baziar, Habib Shahnazari, Hassan Sharafi,
Volume 9, Issue 2 (6-2011)
Abstract

This paper discusses the applicability of a simple model to predict pore water pressure generation in non-plastic silty soil during

cyclic loading. Several Stress-controlled cyclic hollow torsional tests were conducted to directly measure excess pore water pressure

generation at different levels of cyclic stress ratios (CSR) for the specimens prepared with different silt contents (SC=0% to 100%).

The soil specimens were tested under three different confining pressures (&sigma'3= 60, 120, 240 kPa) at a constant relative density

(Dr=60%), with different silt contents. Results of these tests were used to investigate the behavior of silty sands under undrained

cyclic hollow torsional loading conditions. In general, beneficial effects of the silt were observed in the form of a decrease in excess

pore water pressure and an increase in the volumetric strain. Modified model for pore water pressure generation model based on

the test results are also presented in this paper. Comparison of the proposed pore pressure build up model with seed’s model

indicates the advantage of proposed model for soil with large amount of silt.


M. H. Baziar, A. Saeedi Azizkandi,
Volume 11, Issue 2 (11-2013)
Abstract

Due to its critical impact and significant destructive nature during and after seismic events, soil liquefaction and liquefactioninduced

lateral ground spreading have been increasingly important topics in the geotechnical earthquake engineering field

during the past four decades. The aim of this research is to develop an empirical model for the assessment of liquefaction-induced

lateral ground spreading. This study includes three main stages: compilation of liquefaction-induced lateral ground spreading

data from available earthquake case histories (the total number of 525 data points), detecting importance level of seismological,

topographical and geotechnical parameters for the resulted deformations, and proposing an empirical relation to predict

horizontal ground displacement in both ground slope and free face conditions. The statistical parameters and parametric study

presented for this model indicate the superiority of the current relation over the already introduced relations and its applicability

for engineers.


A. H. Eghbali, K. Fakharian,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Portland cement can be mixed with sand to improve its mechanical characteristics. Many studies are reported in literature on this topic, but the effect of principal stress rotation has not been investigated yet. Considering the inherent anisotropy of most sands, it is not clear whether the added cement shall contribute to equal increase in strength and stiffness at vertical and horizontal directions or not. Furthermore, it is not well understood how the cement as an additive in non-compacted (loose) sand compared to compacted (dense) sand without cement, contribute to improving the material behavior in undrained condition such as limiting the deformations and the liquefaction potential. In this research, undrained triaxial and simple shear tests under different stress paths are carried out on different mixtures of Portland cement (by adding 1.5, 3 and 5 percent) with clean sand to investigate the effect of principal stress rotations. The triaxial test results revealed that the cement mixture reduces the anisotropy, while it improves the mixture mechanical properties compared to compacted sand without cement. The results of the simple shear tests validated the triaxial test results and further clarified the effect of the  parameter or rotation of principal stresses on the behavior of cemented sand mixtures.
M. B. Esfandiari Sowmehsaraei, R. Jamshidi Chenari,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Soil reinforced with fiber shows characteristics of a composite material, in which fiber inclusion has a significant effect on soil permeability. Concerning to the higher void ratio of carpet fibers, at first stages it may be expected that an increase in fiber content of the reinforced soil would result in an increase in permeability of the mixture. However, the present article demonstrates that fiber inclusion will decrease the permeability of sand-fiber composite.A series of constant head permeability tests have been carried out to show the effects and consequently, a new system of phase relationships was introduced to calculate the dry mass for the sand portion of the composite. Monte Carlo simulation technique adopted with finite element theory was employed to back calculate the hydraulic conductivity of individual porous fibers from the laboratory test results. It was observed that the permeability coefficient of the porous fibers are orders of magnitude less than the skeletal sand portion due to the fine sand particle entrapment and also the fiber volume change characteristics.
H. Shahnazari, M. A. Shahin, M. A. Tutunchian,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Due to the heterogeneous nature of granular soils and the involvement of many effective parameters in the geotechnical behavior of soil-foundation systems, the accurate prediction of shallow foundation settlements on cohesionless soils is a complex engineering problem. In this study, three new evolutionary-based techniques, including evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), classical genetic programming (GP), and gene expression programming (GEP), are utilized to obtain more accurate predictive settlement models. The models are developed using a large databank of standard penetration test (SPT)-based case histories. The values obtained from the new models are compared with those of the most precise models that have been previously proposed by researchers. The results show that the new EPR and GP-based models are able to predict the foundation settlement on cohesionless soils under the described conditions with R2 values higher than 87%. The artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic programming (GP)-based models obtained from the literature, have R2 values of about 85% and 83%, respectively which are higher than 80% for the GEP-based model. A subsequent comprehensive parametric study is further carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the foundation settlement to the effective input parameters. The comparison results prove that the new EPR and GP-based models are the most accurate models. In this study, the feasibility of the EPR, GP and GEP approaches in finding solutions for highly nonlinear problems such as settlement of shallow foundations on granular soils is also clearly illustrated. The developed models are quite simple and straightforward and can be used reliably for routine design practice.
Ali Kavand, S.mohsen Haeri, Arian Asefzadeh, Iraj Rahmani, Abbas Ghalandarzadeh, Ali Bakhshi,
Volume 12, Issue 3 (7-2014)
Abstract

In this paper, different aspects of the behavior of 2×2 pile groups under liquefaction-induced lateral spreading in a 3-layer soil profile is investigated using large scale 1-g shake table test. Different parameters of the response of soil and piles including time-histories of accelerations, pore water pressures, displacements and bending moments are presented and discussed in the paper. In addition, distribution of lateral forces due to lateral spreading on individual piles of the groups is investigated in detail. The results show that total lateral forces on the piles are influenced by the shadow effect as well as the superstructure mass attached to the pile cap. It was also found that lateral forces exerted on the piles in the lower half of the liquefied layer are significantly larger than those recommended by the design code. Based on the numerical analyses performed, it is shown that the displacement based method is more capable of predicting the pile group behavior in this experiment comparing to the force based method provided that the model parameters are tuned.
M. Alibolandi, Dr. R. Ziaie Moayed,
Volume 13, Issue 3 (12-2015)
Abstract

In this study a series of cyclic triaxial tests were performed to examine the undrained dynamic resistance of silty sand reinforced with various arrangements of geotextile layers. The silt content of samples varies in percentage from 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%. A total of 32 laboratory cyclic triaxial tests have been performed on silty sand samples reinforced with geotextile layers in different depths. All tests were performed with 100 kPa confining pressure, subjected to an isotropic consolidated undrained (CIU) condition. The tests were conducted at a frequency of 2 Hz. Results indicate that both the geotextile arrangement and the silt content were most essential in the liquefaction potential of reinforced sands. An increase in the number of geotextile layers enhanced the cyclic resistance of reinforced samples against the liquefaction potential. It was also found that when the geotextile layer was posited near the top of the specimen (load application part) the liquefaction resistance would increase (e.g. for clean sands, the improvement of liquefaction resistance caused by the geotextile layer had a 0.2 depth, and the sample height was 5.5 times greater than the geotextile layer inserted in mid height of sample H). Based on the obtained results, effects of geotextile on liquefaction resistance decreased as fines content increased to about 33%. Further increase in the fines content however, would lead to higher in reinforcement advantages. The liquefaction improvement is more effective with a higher number of geotextile layers. The results also revealed that the reinforcement effect in FC≈33 % is at its lowest amount. 


Behrooz Mehrzad, Abdolhosein Haddad, Yaser Jafarian,
Volume 14, Issue 2 (3-2016)
Abstract

Currently, there is no reliable design procedure which considers all aspects of liquefaction effects on shallow foundations. There are many light and heavy structures resting on saturated sand with high liquefaction potential in seismic areas. The aim of this experimental and numerical study is to evaluate the performance of two shallow foundations with different contact pressures in liquefaction. The results of the centrifuge experiment of shallow foundations with surcharges of three-story and nine-story buildings on liquefiable sand are presented in detail. Although entire soil profile liquefied, no liquefaction observed under the foundations. There was a clear difference in settlement mechanisms observed beneath the shallow foundation and in the free-field. The heavy foundation fluctuated more strongly compared with the lighter one. The effect of soil permeability and contact pressure on foundation response was investigated during numerical study. The experiment was simulated two dimensionally using a fully coupled nonlinear constitutive model (UBCSAND) implemented in a finite difference program, FLAC-2D. The results show that settlement of foundations increased with the increase of soil permeability. Trends of excess pore water pressure were captured reasonably by the soil model, but the settlement mechanisms were different. The soil model underestimated total liquefaction-induced settlement of shallow foundation, especially for light foundation.



Volume 14, Issue 4 (6-2016)
Abstract

Complete recognition of calcareous sediments engineering behavior considering their local expansion and wide variety of engineering properties is very important. In south parts of Iran, there are some carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs which are covered by calcareous deposits. Hormuz Island in is one of the most strategic areas in Hormuz Strait between Persian Gulf and Oman Sea. In this study, a series of undrained monotonic and cyclic simple shear tests was performed on saturated Hormuz calcareous sand specimens using hollow cylinder torsional apparatus. The tests were carried out on specimens with various relative densities under different effective consolidation stresses. Based on the results, pore pressure generation, shear strain development, stress-strain characteristics of the specimens are presented and compared with the technical literature. In addition, dissipation of strain-based energy during the cyclic loading and its relation to excess pore water pressure is described. The cyclic resistance curves of specimens with different initial conditions are plotted. Also the results of monotonic and cyclic tests are compared together for better interpretation of Hormuz calcareous sand under undrained torsional loading.



Page 1 from 1     

© 2019 All Rights Reserved | International Journal of Civil Engineering

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb