Search published articles


Showing 3 results for Hot Mix Asphalt

M. Ameri, J. Shahi, H. Khani Sanij,
Volume 11, Issue 1 (3-2013)
Abstract

The use of geotextiles to postpone reflective cracks in asphalt overlay is a popular practice, so researchers are eager to calculate its structural value. This research study has focused on this issue for geotextiles used in the roads of Iran. Twelve sections from the Tehran-Qom road were tested each examined before and after construction of the overlay. The tests were of the Falling Weight Deflectometer type, and at least twelve tests were conducted each time. The data from five sections (four for developing the model and one for evaluating the output) allowed a new mathematical model to be developed. For the seven remaining sections, some foreign and Iranian geotextiles were used as interlayers. The mean structural value for all of the geotextiles was equivalent to that of a 2.92 cm-thick Hot Mix Asphalt overlay, while that for only the Iranian sections was equivalent to 2.28 cm. Economic evaluations, based on construction costs, showed that in 2011 the use of geotextiles was economical in Iran, because fuel and bitumen subsidies had been eliminated and different geotextile brands had been brought to market in the country.
Ali Topal, Julide Oner, Burak Sengoz, Peyman Aghazadeh Dokandari, Derya Kaya,
Volume 15, Issue 4 (6-2017)
Abstract

In recent years, environmental protection is increasingly becoming a major issue in transportation including asphalt production. Despite the fact that Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) is widely used around the world some recent studies suggest using Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology that reduces the production and placement temperature of asphalt mixes. Currently, a common way of producing WMA is through the utilization of additives. This paper firstly characterizes the effect of WMA additives (organic, chemical, water containing additives) on base bitumen properties. Following the determination of optimum bitumen content of the mixtures with different WMA additives through Marshall Test, Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device is used to measure the permanent deformation characteristics of WMA mixtures. Based on the findings of this study, the utilization of WMA additives help in the reduction of viscosity values which are in return decreases mixing and compaction temperature leading to the reduction of energy costs as well as emissions. Besides, it can be concluded that all WMA mixtures performed better than HMA mixtures in the matter of rut depth.


Dr. Mohammad Khasawneh,
Volume 15, Issue 7 (10-2017)
Abstract

During the entire life cycle of a pavement, highway agencies are expected to maintain adequate surface frictional properties to facilitate traction between car tires and pavement surface. Traditionally the repair method for a friction-deficient pavement surface is the application of a new surfacing layer. The monitoring and remedying practice is important however, it is a passive approach toward the problem. A more proactive approach would be to test the hot mix asphalt in the laboratory during its initial mix design stage to ensure that aggregate combinations used in the asphalt pavement will provide adequate friction over the life of the pavement. Toward this objective the polishing behavior of laboratory-prepared HMA specimens made of eight different job mix formulas has been studied in terms of friction values. In addition, a robust statistical analysis of the obtained surface friction values has also been carried out in an attempt to verify the success in developing this new asphalt polisher that is used to simulate the tire-pavement interaction. Furthermore, polishing behavior (i.e., polishing trend, rate of friction loss and absolute and percent values of decrease) were all fully investigated to capture surface frictional deterioration of HMA specimens. In conclusion, the new asphalt polisher showed a good degree of repeatability. Additionally, it has been concluded that the decrease in polish number is maximum during the first hour of polishing. With the passage of time the drop in friction decreases and stabilizes.



Page 1 from 1     

© 2019 All Rights Reserved | International Journal of Civil Engineering

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb