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Showing 2 results for Fault Rupture Propagation

S.m. Moosavi, M.k. Jafari , M. Kamalian, A. Shafiee ,
Volume 8, Issue 2 (6-2010)
Abstract

Ground differential movements due to faulting have been observed to cause damage to engineered structures

and facilities. Although surface fault rupture is not a new problem, there are only a few building codes in the world

containing some type of provisions for reducing the risks. Fault setbacks or avoidance of construction in the proximity

to seismically active faults, are usually supposed as the first priority. In this paper, based on some 1-g physical

modelling tests, clear perspectives of surface fault rupture propagation and its interaction with shallow rigid

foundations are presented. It is observed that the surface fault rupture could be diverted by massive structures seated

on thick soil deposits. Where possible the fault has been deviated by the presence of the rigid foundation, which

remained undisturbed on the footwall. It is shown that the setback provision does not give generally enough assurance

that future faulting would not threaten the existing structures.


M. Mortazavi Zanjani, A. Soroush,
Volume 11, Issue 2 (11-2013)
Abstract

This paper presents results of a thorough study on the phenomenon of rupture propagation of reverse faults from the bedrock

foundation through homogeneous clayey embankments, mainly at the end of construction, with complementary analyses for the

steady state seepage through the embankment. The study is performed by means of numerical analyses with a nonlinear Finite

Element Method, verified beforehand through simulating fault propagations in an existing horizontal soil layer experiment.

Multiple cases considering three slopes & three clayey soils for the embankment and five fault dip angles, activated in several

locations of base of the embankment, are analyzed. The results show that ruptures in the embankment follow optimal paths to

reach the surface and their near-surface directions are predictable with respect to corresponding theories of classical soil

mechanics. Various types of rupture in the embankment are produced on the basis of the rupture types, the embankment base is

divided into three distinguishable zones, which can be used for interpretation of fault ruptures behavior. The effects of materials

and slope of the embankment, fault dip angle, and fault’s point of application in the bedrock-soil interface on the rupture paths

are studied in depth.



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