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Showing 5 results for Debonding

M. Z. Kabir, A. Hojatkashani,
Volume 10, Issue 4 (12-2012)
Abstract

The aim of current study is to investigate the effect of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites on the fatigue

response of reinforced concrete beams. 6 reinforced concrete (RC) beams from which 3 were retrofitted with CFRP sheets, were

prepared and subjected to fatigue load cycles. To predict and trace the failure occurrence and its growth, a small notch was

induced at the middle span in bottom surface of all RC specimens. At the certain points, strains in concrete and CFRP were

measured in each cycle. The upper limit of applied load was considered at the level of design service load of bridges. In addition,

strain measurements facilitated to the calculation of interfacial shear stresses between concrete substrate and the CFRP layer.

The variation of such stresses through load cycles has been presented and discussed. Also, a discussion on possibility of the local

debonding phenomenon resulted from such interfacial stresses was presented. Load–deflection curves, strain responses and

propagation of tensile cracks provided an insight on the performance of the CFRP strengthened beams subjected to different

cycles of fatigue loading. Variation of load-deflection curves through fatigue load cycles depicted stiffness degradation which

was discussed in the research.


M. Khorami, J. Sobhani,
Volume 11, Issue 4 (12-2013)
Abstract

Worldwide, asbestos fibers utilized in fiber cement boards, have been recognized as harmful materials regarding the public health and environmental pollutions. These concerns motivate the researchers to find the appropriate alternatives to substitute the asbestos material towards the sustainability policies. In this paper, the applicability of asbestos replacement with three types of agricultural waste fibers, including bagasse, wheat and eucalyptus fibers were experimentally investigated. To this end, the flexural behaviour and microstructure of cement composite boards made by addition of 2 % and 4 % of waste agricultural fibers in combination with and without 5 % replacement of silica fume by mass of cement were evaluated. The results of this study attested the applicability of utilized waste agricultural fibers in production of cement composite boards by improving the flexural and energy absorption characteristics, more or less, depending on the type of fibers. Moreover, it is found that application of silica fume in production of cement composite boards led to an increase in flexural strength.
A. H. Eghbali, K. Fakharian,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Portland cement can be mixed with sand to improve its mechanical characteristics. Many studies are reported in literature on this topic, but the effect of principal stress rotation has not been investigated yet. Considering the inherent anisotropy of most sands, it is not clear whether the added cement shall contribute to equal increase in strength and stiffness at vertical and horizontal directions or not. Furthermore, it is not well understood how the cement as an additive in non-compacted (loose) sand compared to compacted (dense) sand without cement, contribute to improving the material behavior in undrained condition such as limiting the deformations and the liquefaction potential. In this research, undrained triaxial and simple shear tests under different stress paths are carried out on different mixtures of Portland cement (by adding 1.5, 3 and 5 percent) with clean sand to investigate the effect of principal stress rotations. The triaxial test results revealed that the cement mixture reduces the anisotropy, while it improves the mixture mechanical properties compared to compacted sand without cement. The results of the simple shear tests validated the triaxial test results and further clarified the effect of the  parameter or rotation of principal stresses on the behavior of cemented sand mixtures.
A. R. Rahai, M. Mortazavi,
Volume 12, Issue 4 (12-2014)
Abstract

During the past years the use of buckling restrained braces (BRBs) have had a dramatic growth due to their better performance comparing to conventional braces. BRBs have more ductility and energy absorption capacity by excluding the overall brace buckling. However, even these kinds of braces have some problems restricting their use in some projects, i.e. high tolerance of applying unbonding material, concrete placing difficulties and their weight. Accordingly, many researchers have conducted experiments to find the possibility of shortening or even eliminating the infill material of the braces. The following study has addressed the effect of debonding material friction ratio, shortening the concrete fill, and finally eliminating it if possible, by reshaping the core element with constant section area. The operated analysis has been carried out both numerically and experimentally. ABAQUS finite element software was applied for numerical analysis and the results were verified by an experimental study in two groups of models each including four full-scale brace models. With a constant core section area, results revealed that without the risk of buckling, the concrete cover length could be reduced. With a special core profile, the infill may be fully omitted and the restrainer would be made up of only a steel tube, which may happen without any changes made to the cross sectional area of the core profile.
A.r. Sattarifar, M.k. Sharbatdar, A. Dalvand,
Volume 13, Issue 4 (12-2015)
Abstract

In this paper, an experimental study has been conducted on strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) connections by FRP sheets. The innovation of this research is using narrow grooves on critical regions of connection to increase the adherence of FRP sheets and prevent their early debonding. Therefore, four RC connections were made and tested under a constant axial load on the column and an increasing cyclic load on the beam. The first specimen, as the standard reference specimen, had close tie spacing in ductile regions of beam, column and panel zone based on seismic design provisions, and the second specimen, as the weak reference specimen did not have these conditions in all regions. Two other weak specimens were strengthened using two different strengthening patterns with FRP sheets one by ordinary surface preparation and the other with surface grooving method for installing FRP sheets on the connection. The results showed that ultimate load and ductility of the weak specimen compared to standard specimen decreased 25% and 17%, respectively. The shear failure and concrete crushing were prevented in the ductile regions of the beam and panel zone in both strengthened specimens. Also, it was observed that early debonding of FRP sheets was prevented in the strengthened connection with grooving pattern and so had desirable ductility and bearing capacity similar to the standard specimen.



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