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Showing 4 results for Axial Capacity

J. Nazari Afshar, M. Ghazavi,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

The Stone-column is a useful method for increasing the bearing capacity and reducing settlement of foundation soil. The prediction of accurate ultimate bearing capacity of stone columns is very important in soil improvement techniques. Bulging failure mechanism usually controls the failure mechanism. In this paper, an imaginary retaining wall is used such that it stretches vertically from the stone column edge. A simple analytical method is introduced for estimation of the ultimate bearing capacity of the stone column using Coulomb lateral earth pressure theory. Presented method needs conventional Mohr-coloumb shear strength parameters of the stone column material and the native soil for estimation the ultimate bearing capacity of stone column. The validity of the developed method has been verified using finite element method and test data. Parametric studies have been carried out and effects of contributing parameters such as stone column diameter, column spacing, and the internal friction angle of the stone column material on the ultimate bearing capacity have been investigated.
A. Eslami, I. Tajvidi, M. Karimpour-Fard,
Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2014)
Abstract

Three common approaches to determine the axial pile capacity based on static analysis and in-situ tests are presented, compared and evaluated. The Unified Pile Design (UPD), American Petroleum Institute (API) and a SPT based methods were chosen to be validated. The API is a common method to estimate the axial bearing capacity of piles in marine environments, where as the others are currently used by geotechnical engineers. Seventy pile load test records performed in the northern bank of Persian Gulf with SPT profile have been compiled for methods evaluation. In all cases, pile capacities were measured using full scale static compression and/or pull out loading tests. As the loading tests in some cases were in the format of proof test without reaching the plunging or ultimate bearing capacity, for interpretation the results, offset limit load criteria was employed. Three statistical and probability based approaches in the form of a systematic ranking, called Rank Index, RI, were utilized to evaluate the performance of predictive methods. Wasted Capacity Index (WCI) concept was also applied to validate the efficiency of current methods. The evaluations revealed that among these three predictive methods, the UPD is more accurate and cost effective than the others.
M. Zare, A. Eslami,
Volume 12, Issue 4 (12-2014)
Abstract

Physical modeling for study of deep foundations can be performed in simple chambers (1g), calibration chambers (CC),

and centrifuge apparatus (ng). These common apparatus face certain limitations and difficulties. Recently, Frustum Confining

Vessels (FCV) have been evolved for physical modeling of deep foundations and penetrometers. Shaped as the frustum of a

cone, this device applies steady pressure on its bottom and creates a linear stress distribution along its vertical central core.

This paper presents the key findings in FCV, as developed in AUT. The FCV has a height of 1200 mm, with top and bottom

diameters of 300 and 1300 mm, respectively. By applying bottom pressure up to 600 kPa, the in-situ overburden stress

conditions, equivalent up to 40 m soil deposits, become consistent with the embedment depth of commonly used piles.

Observations indicated that a linear trend of stress distribution exists, and this device can create overburden stress in the

desired control volume along the central core. Moreover, a couple of compressive and tensile load tests were performed on

steel model piles driven in sand with a length of 750 mm, and different length to diameter (L/D) ratios between 8-15.

Comparison between measured and predicted ultimate capacity of model piles performed in FCV demonstrate a suitable

conformity for similar confinement conditions in the field. Therefore, the FCV can be considered as an appropriate approach

for the investigation of piling geotechnical behavior, and the examination of construction effects.


Guray Arslan, Muzaffer Borekci, Muzaffer Balci, Melih Hacisalihoglu,
Volume 14, Issue 3 (4-2016)
Abstract

The contribution of concrete to inelastic deformation capacity and shear strength of reinforced concrete (RC) columns failing in shear has been investigated extensively by various researchers. Although RC members are designed to have shear strengths much greater than their flexural strengths to ensure flexural failure according to the current codes, shear degradation of RC columns failing in flexure has not been studied widely. The aim of this study is to investigate the shear degradation of RC columns using finite element analyses (FEA). The results of FEA are compared with the results of experimental studies selected from literature, and it is observed that the lateral load-deflection curves of analysed columns are compatible with the experimental results. Twenty-six RC columns were analysed under monotonically increasing loads to determine the concrete contribution to shear strength. The results of analyses indicate that increasing the ratio of shear to flexural strength reduces the concrete contribution to shear strength of the columns.



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